Tag Archives: immunity

Microbiome research has developed exponentially during the recent years and is moving from a descriptive state to one where causality is now tackled. On the other hand, almost every major pharmaceutical or nutrition company, and a huge number of startup companies have invested this field. Altogether, this is a very appropriate timing for the Los Angeles FAID that aims at bringing…

Miriam García del Horno

Microbiome research has developed exponentially during the recent years and is moving from a descriptive state to one where causality is now tackled. On the other hand, almost every major pharmaceutical or nutrition company, and a huge number of startup companies have invested this field. Altogether, this is a very appropriate timing for the Los Angeles FAID that aims at bringing…

Miriam García del Horno

Deep inside your small intestine is a region that’s critical in the body’s immune system: the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). At this site, your body’s cells interact with both microbes and immune cells, and the results of their interactions decide whether you will tolerate the things encountered in the gut—whether a particular food molecule or a foreign microbe—or alternatively, whether…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Deep inside your small intestine is a region that’s critical in the body’s immune system: the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). At this site, your body’s cells interact with both microbes and immune cells, and the results of their interactions decide whether you will tolerate the things encountered in the gut—whether a particular food molecule or a foreign microbe—or alternatively, whether…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter
post_gut_microbiota_salt

Recent research has explored how specific dietary components such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates, probiotics and polyphenols interact with the gut microbiome to confer health benefits on the host. Although high salt content in the Western diet is a public health concern, as it has been linked with several cardiovascular-related disorders, little is known about whether the deleterious effects of a…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

post_gut_microbiota_salt

Recent research has explored how specific dietary components such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates, probiotics and polyphenols interact with the gut microbiome to confer health benefits on the host. Although high salt content in the Western diet is a public health concern, as it has been linked with several cardiovascular-related disorders, little is known about whether the deleterious effects of a…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Recent research has started focusing on the role of the oral microbiota in host health and exacerbation of some systemic diseases. Although increased levels of certain oral-derived microbes have been found in the gut microbiota of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, liver cirrhosis, and colon cancer, little is known regarding whether oral pathobionts -resident bacteria that…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Recent research has started focusing on the role of the oral microbiota in host health and exacerbation of some systemic diseases. Although increased levels of certain oral-derived microbes have been found in the gut microbiota of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, liver cirrhosis, and colon cancer, little is known regarding whether oral pathobionts -resident bacteria that…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Germ-free mice have been used widely during the last decade for studying the relevance and effect of resident bacteria on host physiology and pathology. Experimental data using animals with controlled gut colonization have identified three main primary functions of the gut microbiota: a) metabolic activities that result in salvage of energy and absorbable nutrients; b) protection of the host against…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Germ-free mice have been used widely during the last decade for studying the relevance and effect of resident bacteria on host physiology and pathology. Experimental data using animals with controlled gut colonization have identified three main primary functions of the gut microbiota: a) metabolic activities that result in salvage of energy and absorbable nutrients; b) protection of the host against…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

From avoiding sushi to obsessive hand-washing, many pregnant women—with good reason—do everything in their power to avoid becoming sick. But when a woman does develop a minor ailment like a cold during pregnancy, she may be strongly tempted to seek out antibiotics—just to be on the safe side. But a new study adds to evidence that this might not be…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

From avoiding sushi to obsessive hand-washing, many pregnant women—with good reason—do everything in their power to avoid becoming sick. But when a woman does develop a minor ailment like a cold during pregnancy, she may be strongly tempted to seek out antibiotics—just to be on the safe side. But a new study adds to evidence that this might not be…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Previous research has found that the gut microbiome modulates both immune system development and gut homeostasis through its interaction with the host immune cells. Although both innate and adaptive humoral responses target distinct commensal bacteria via mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), little is known about whether secretory immunoglobulin M (SIgM) is also involved. A new study, led by Dr. Andrea…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has found that the gut microbiome modulates both immune system development and gut homeostasis through its interaction with the host immune cells. Although both innate and adaptive humoral responses target distinct commensal bacteria via mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), little is known about whether secretory immunoglobulin M (SIgM) is also involved. A new study, led by Dr. Andrea…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Cosmic radiation, microgravity: just two of the things astronauts are exposed to in their work that most of us never worry about here on Earth. But one thing astronauts do not encounter, if at all possible, is a great variety of bacteria. During both training exercises in confined environments and actual spaceflight, technical teams go to great lengths to make…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Cosmic radiation, microgravity: just two of the things astronauts are exposed to in their work that most of us never worry about here on Earth. But one thing astronauts do not encounter, if at all possible, is a great variety of bacteria. During both training exercises in confined environments and actual spaceflight, technical teams go to great lengths to make…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Previous research has shown that the gut microbiota may have a role in the pathogenesis of immune-related diseases involving chronic inflammation, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and others. A recent review, led by Dr. Hai Lu from the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University in Guangzhou (China), discusses the existing…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that the gut microbiota may have a role in the pathogenesis of immune-related diseases involving chronic inflammation, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and others. A recent review, led by Dr. Hai Lu from the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University in Guangzhou (China), discusses the existing…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados