Tag Archives: Immune system

Picture three people seated side-by-side on the airplane. The person in the middle has come down with the flu and spends the two-hour flight coughing, shivering, and drifting in and out of a feverish sleep. The others have good reason to be vexed—indeed, the person on the right ends up with the exact same symptoms the next day. The person…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Picture three people seated side-by-side on the airplane. The person in the middle has come down with the flu and spends the two-hour flight coughing, shivering, and drifting in and out of a feverish sleep. The others have good reason to be vexed—indeed, the person on the right ends up with the exact same symptoms the next day. The person…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Previous preclinical research (here; here) has shown that the gut microbiota helps modulate the host response to influenza infection -germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice usually exhibit weak protection against influenza virus. However, underlying mechanisms mediating this effect and microbial factors involved have not been fully elucidated. A recent study, led by Dr. Thaddeus Stappenbeck from the Department of Pathology and Immunology…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous preclinical research (here; here) has shown that the gut microbiota helps modulate the host response to influenza infection -germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice usually exhibit weak protection against influenza virus. However, underlying mechanisms mediating this effect and microbial factors involved have not been fully elucidated. A recent study, led by Dr. Thaddeus Stappenbeck from the Department of Pathology and Immunology…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Researchers from McMaster University (Canada) had a clear question in mind when they conducted their recent experiment: if a mouse had its gut microbiota altered by antibiotics in early life, what would happen to its brain? The question might have seemed a non-sequitur—why would something that changes the gut have any effect on the brain? Yet the group of researchers,…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Researchers from McMaster University (Canada) had a clear question in mind when they conducted their recent experiment: if a mouse had its gut microbiota altered by antibiotics in early life, what would happen to its brain? The question might have seemed a non-sequitur—why would something that changes the gut have any effect on the brain? Yet the group of researchers,…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Previous research has shown antibiotics may increase the risk of immune-related diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by disturbing the composition and functions of the gut microbiota. Although the use of antibiotics during the peripartum period (including both the preterm and post-natal periods) has been suggested as a risk factor for IBD development later in life, little is known about…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown antibiotics may increase the risk of immune-related diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by disturbing the composition and functions of the gut microbiota. Although the use of antibiotics during the peripartum period (including both the preterm and post-natal periods) has been suggested as a risk factor for IBD development later in life, little is known about…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Fast food, gut microbes, sweet drinks, desk jobs: over the years, obesity has been blamed on many things. A Time-Life book on food and nutrition from 1967 implicated—among other things—cars. "The automobile has almost eliminated walking," write the authors. "This decrease in exercise, which reduces the requirement for calories, has not always been accompanied by a corresponding decrease in appetite."…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Fast food, gut microbes, sweet drinks, desk jobs: over the years, obesity has been blamed on many things. A Time-Life book on food and nutrition from 1967 implicated—among other things—cars. "The automobile has almost eliminated walking," write the authors. "This decrease in exercise, which reduces the requirement for calories, has not always been accompanied by a corresponding decrease in appetite."…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Celiac disease (CeD) is a complex immune mediated disorder that is triggered by abnormal immune responses to the dietary protein gluten, which is found in grains like wheat, barley, and rye. Normally, immune tolerance to dietary proteins prevents inflammatory immune responses from developing. However, in those with CeD, the presence of HLA susceptibility genes plus unknown environmental or immune triggers…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Celiac disease (CeD) is a complex immune mediated disorder that is triggered by abnormal immune responses to the dietary protein gluten, which is found in grains like wheat, barley, and rye. Normally, immune tolerance to dietary proteins prevents inflammatory immune responses from developing. However, in those with CeD, the presence of HLA susceptibility genes plus unknown environmental or immune triggers…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Fiber is good for health—that much we know. But for decades, scientists have been searching for the answer to a very simple question: how does dietary fiber manage to benefit the body? The answer turns out to be quite complicated. Currently, scientists think the gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the how fibre benefits health—and it's mostly thanks to…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Fiber is good for health—that much we know. But for decades, scientists have been searching for the answer to a very simple question: how does dietary fiber manage to benefit the body? The answer turns out to be quite complicated. Currently, scientists think the gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the how fibre benefits health—and it's mostly thanks to…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The microbiota that resides in the gastrointestinal tract provides essential health benefits to its host, particularly by regulating immune homeostasis. Besides this, it has recently become relevant that alterations of intestinal microbial communities may be involved in the immune dysregulation that leads to autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. But little is known regarding the immunomodulatory…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The microbiota that resides in the gastrointestinal tract provides essential health benefits to its host, particularly by regulating immune homeostasis. Besides this, it has recently become relevant that alterations of intestinal microbial communities may be involved in the immune dysregulation that leads to autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. But little is known regarding the immunomodulatory…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Without exception, a diagnosis of celiac disease (CD; an autoimmune reaction to eating gluten) comes with a life sentence of wheat and gluten avoidance. Even small amounts of gluten for those with CD can trigger a reaction that damages the lining of the small intestine and sometimes causes uncomfortable gastrointestinal symptoms. But since avoiding every last trace of wheat can…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Without exception, a diagnosis of celiac disease (CD; an autoimmune reaction to eating gluten) comes with a life sentence of wheat and gluten avoidance. Even small amounts of gluten for those with CD can trigger a reaction that damages the lining of the small intestine and sometimes causes uncomfortable gastrointestinal symptoms. But since avoiding every last trace of wheat can…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

A recent study led by Dr. Alex Mira (FISABIO, Spain) and Dr. Maria C. Jenmalm (Linköping University, Sweden) and researchers at IATA-CSIC (Spain) has presented an analysis of a total of 192 faecal samples from 28 healthy children and 20 children developing allergic symptoms at age seven, from when the children were 1 and 12 months of age. It has…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A recent study led by Dr. Alex Mira (FISABIO, Spain) and Dr. Maria C. Jenmalm (Linköping University, Sweden) and researchers at IATA-CSIC (Spain) has presented an analysis of a total of 192 faecal samples from 28 healthy children and 20 children developing allergic symptoms at age seven, from when the children were 1 and 12 months of age. It has…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados