Tag Archives: health

There’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all nutrition. In 2015, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel laid the foundation for this statement with an article that proved that each of us metabolises food differently due, in part, to gut microbiota. Researcher Niv Zmora explained to Gut Microbiota for Health the main results of that study during the GMFH…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

There’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all nutrition. In 2015, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel laid the foundation for this statement with an article that proved that each of us metabolises food differently due, in part, to gut microbiota. Researcher Niv Zmora explained to Gut Microbiota for Health the main results of that study during the GMFH…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

The scientific literature on gut microbiota, nutrition, and health has grown exponentially over the past few years. As a result, keeping up with this fast-moving field is increasingly challenging for busy clinicians. When it comes to gut microbiota and nutrition, health professionals note a lack of evidence-based resources for informing their practice, and limited opportunities for clinic-focused professional development. Gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The scientific literature on gut microbiota, nutrition, and health has grown exponentially over the past few years. As a result, keeping up with this fast-moving field is increasingly challenging for busy clinicians. When it comes to gut microbiota and nutrition, health professionals note a lack of evidence-based resources for informing their practice, and limited opportunities for clinic-focused professional development. Gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The human gut microbiota composition and metabolic activities are modulated by the diet, and reciprocally, host metabolism and metabolites also interact with the gut microbiota and diet, shaping a complex interacting network that relates to gut health. Several factors can influence the human gut microbiota, with diet being a very important one. Not only dietary pattern (vegetarian vs. omnivorous dietary…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The human gut microbiota composition and metabolic activities are modulated by the diet, and reciprocally, host metabolism and metabolites also interact with the gut microbiota and diet, shaping a complex interacting network that relates to gut health. Several factors can influence the human gut microbiota, with diet being a very important one. Not only dietary pattern (vegetarian vs. omnivorous dietary…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

“Standing room only” was reported from the microbiome presentations at the recent Digestive Disease Week 2017 (#DDW17)—not an unusual circumstance at academic and medical conferences all around the world. And it’s no surprise that scientists and health professionals are keen to increase their knowledge, since microbiome-related diagnostics and interventions may soon add valuable tools to the arsenal of modern medicine.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

“Standing room only” was reported from the microbiome presentations at the recent Digestive Disease Week 2017 (#DDW17)—not an unusual circumstance at academic and medical conferences all around the world. And it’s no surprise that scientists and health professionals are keen to increase their knowledge, since microbiome-related diagnostics and interventions may soon add valuable tools to the arsenal of modern medicine.…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Recent research has studied the role of the gut microbiome in modulating risk of several metabolic and immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune psoriasis and arthritis, and cancer. Although it is a well-known fact that diet is a major player in modulating both composition and function of the gut microbiome, little is known…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Recent research has studied the role of the gut microbiome in modulating risk of several metabolic and immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune psoriasis and arthritis, and cancer. Although it is a well-known fact that diet is a major player in modulating both composition and function of the gut microbiome, little is known…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The Gut Microbiota for Health editing team sees intestinal health as the engine for overall health. Our team closely tracks the science on gut microbiota-nutrition interactions, which shows the important daily influences of food on the gut. Since the prevalence of digestive disorders worldwide remains high, the wider public seeks information on this topic, and the internet has a wealth…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The Gut Microbiota for Health editing team sees intestinal health as the engine for overall health. Our team closely tracks the science on gut microbiota-nutrition interactions, which shows the important daily influences of food on the gut. Since the prevalence of digestive disorders worldwide remains high, the wider public seeks information on this topic, and the internet has a wealth…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Cosmic radiation, microgravity: just two of the things astronauts are exposed to in their work that most of us never worry about here on Earth. But one thing astronauts do not encounter, if at all possible, is a great variety of bacteria. During both training exercises in confined environments and actual spaceflight, technical teams go to great lengths to make…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Cosmic radiation, microgravity: just two of the things astronauts are exposed to in their work that most of us never worry about here on Earth. But one thing astronauts do not encounter, if at all possible, is a great variety of bacteria. During both training exercises in confined environments and actual spaceflight, technical teams go to great lengths to make…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Fiber is good for health—that much we know. But for decades, scientists have been searching for the answer to a very simple question: how does dietary fiber manage to benefit the body? The answer turns out to be quite complicated. Currently, scientists think the gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the how fibre benefits health—and it's mostly thanks to…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Fiber is good for health—that much we know. But for decades, scientists have been searching for the answer to a very simple question: how does dietary fiber manage to benefit the body? The answer turns out to be quite complicated. Currently, scientists think the gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the how fibre benefits health—and it's mostly thanks to…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

On March 11th and 12th, nearly 400 scientists and healthcare professionals (gastroenterologists, paediatricians, nutritionists, dieticians, and others) from five continents converged in Paris (France) for the 6th edition of the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit. After the intensive weekend of knowledge sharing about gut microbiota and health from scientific experts from all over the world, the Gut Microbiota for…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

On March 11th and 12th, nearly 400 scientists and healthcare professionals (gastroenterologists, paediatricians, nutritionists, dieticians, and others) from five continents converged in Paris (France) for the 6th edition of the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit. After the intensive weekend of knowledge sharing about gut microbiota and health from scientific experts from all over the world, the Gut Microbiota for…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team