Tag Archives: bacteria

For many years, humans have known that bacteria and other microorganisms are capable of transforming food substrates, making them both tasty and nutritious. More and more, chefs and other food-makers are putting bacteria to work to produce fermented foods. With delicious results. Besides flavour, though, are there other reasons to seek out fermented foods? Scientists around the world are trying…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

For many years, humans have known that bacteria and other microorganisms are capable of transforming food substrates, making them both tasty and nutritious. More and more, chefs and other food-makers are putting bacteria to work to produce fermented foods. With delicious results. Besides flavour, though, are there other reasons to seek out fermented foods? Scientists around the world are trying…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Without exception, a diagnosis of celiac disease (CD; an autoimmune reaction to eating gluten) comes with a life sentence of wheat and gluten avoidance. Even small amounts of gluten for those with CD can trigger a reaction that damages the lining of the small intestine and sometimes causes uncomfortable gastrointestinal symptoms. But since avoiding every last trace of wheat can…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Without exception, a diagnosis of celiac disease (CD; an autoimmune reaction to eating gluten) comes with a life sentence of wheat and gluten avoidance. Even small amounts of gluten for those with CD can trigger a reaction that damages the lining of the small intestine and sometimes causes uncomfortable gastrointestinal symptoms. But since avoiding every last trace of wheat can…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The intestines have their own nervous system, the ENS (enteric nervous system), which has over 500 million neurons. Scientists are investigating how ENS nerve cells communicate with brain neurons through the ‘gut-brain axis’. The latest research shows the actions of ENS neurons are affected by events in the gut environment, including the activities of bacteria that dwell there.    …

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The intestines have their own nervous system, the ENS (enteric nervous system), which has over 500 million neurons. Scientists are investigating how ENS nerve cells communicate with brain neurons through the ‘gut-brain axis’. The latest research shows the actions of ENS neurons are affected by events in the gut environment, including the activities of bacteria that dwell there.    …

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

This fall, a new diversion emerged for a certain scientific set—those for whom Prevotella melaninogenica rolls easily off the tongue. Appearing as the after-hours entertainment at Lake Arrowhead Microbial Genomics 2016, and other conferences focused on bacteria, is Gut Check, a board game created by David Coil, project scientist in microbial ecology and genomics at University of California, Davis (USA).…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

This fall, a new diversion emerged for a certain scientific set—those for whom Prevotella melaninogenica rolls easily off the tongue. Appearing as the after-hours entertainment at Lake Arrowhead Microbial Genomics 2016, and other conferences focused on bacteria, is Gut Check, a board game created by David Coil, project scientist in microbial ecology and genomics at University of California, Davis (USA).…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Probiotics are ‘live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host’. In other words, these friendly bacteria work hard to improve your health. They have strength in numbers – you need to consume a large enough dose of probiotics in order to see their benefits. Evidence shows probiotics positively affect digestive health, but their…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Probiotics are ‘live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host’. In other words, these friendly bacteria work hard to improve your health. They have strength in numbers – you need to consume a large enough dose of probiotics in order to see their benefits. Evidence shows probiotics positively affect digestive health, but their…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In the traditional view of your immune system, your body is a fortress that needs to be defended. You trust your immune system to be constantly on alert for enemies like harmful bacteria and viruses, and to be able to fight them off when they attack. But Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK)…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In the traditional view of your immune system, your body is a fortress that needs to be defended. You trust your immune system to be constantly on alert for enemies like harmful bacteria and viruses, and to be able to fight them off when they attack. But Prof. Philip Calder, Professor of Nutritional Immunology at the University of Southampton (UK)…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter