Gut brain axis

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Previous preclinical and clinical data have reported that alterations in the bidirectional interactions of the central nervous system with the gut (called the gut-brain axis) may be involved in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) pathophysiology. Interestingly, IBS symptom severity has also been related to faecal microbiota signature. However, it is still uncertain to what extent gut microbial composition can be used…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous preclinical and clinical data have reported that alterations in the bidirectional interactions of the central nervous system with the gut (called the gut-brain axis) may be involved in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) pathophysiology. Interestingly, IBS symptom severity has also been related to faecal microbiota signature. However, it is still uncertain to what extent gut microbial composition can be used…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Despite previous research indicating the role of gut microbiota in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the involved mechanisms have not been adequately addressed in model systems. Anecdotal evidence suggests that amyloid plaque formation in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice differs among mouse facilities with different specific-pathogen-free conditions, leading some to wonder whether the gut microbiota (as shaped by environment) influences these amyloid…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Despite previous research indicating the role of gut microbiota in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the involved mechanisms have not been adequately addressed in model systems. Anecdotal evidence suggests that amyloid plaque formation in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice differs among mouse facilities with different specific-pathogen-free conditions, leading some to wonder whether the gut microbiota (as shaped by environment) influences these amyloid…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous research has shown that chemical and physical stress are major influencers of the physiology and ecology of the all microbes that have coevolved with a host. However, the physiologic effects of gut microbiome responses to physiologic stress have been poorly studied in humans. A recent study, led by Dr. Stefan Pasiakos from the Military Nutrition Division at the United…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous research has shown that chemical and physical stress are major influencers of the physiology and ecology of the all microbes that have coevolved with a host. However, the physiologic effects of gut microbiome responses to physiologic stress have been poorly studied in humans. A recent study, led by Dr. Stefan Pasiakos from the Military Nutrition Division at the United…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Recent research has shown the presence of gut dysbiosis related to a shift in short-chain fatty acids in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Besides this, constipation is a major nonmotor feature of PD and little is known about whether probiotics and prebiotics could improve constipation in patients with PD. A recent randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, led by Dr. Emanuele Cereda…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Recent research has shown the presence of gut dysbiosis related to a shift in short-chain fatty acids in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Besides this, constipation is a major nonmotor feature of PD and little is known about whether probiotics and prebiotics could improve constipation in patients with PD. A recent randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, led by Dr. Emanuele Cereda…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.
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Despite previous research indicating the role of gut microbiota in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the involved mechanisms have not been adequately addressed in model systems. Anecdotal evidence suggests that amyloid plaque formation in amyloid precursor protein…

Previous research has shown that chemical and physical stress are major influencers of the physiology and ecology of the all microbes that have coevolved with a host. However, the physiologic effects of gut microbiome responses…