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Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the energy they require to survive, and in exchange they support the physiological, metabolic and immune capacities that have contributed to our evolutionary success. Although currently categorized as an autoimmune disorder and regarded as a complex genetic disease, the ultimate cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains elusive. It seems that interplay…

Speakers: Giovanni Barbara (Italy), Magnus Simren (Sweden)   Prof. Barbara highlighted the fact that there is increasing evidence indicating that the gut microbiota may be involved in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). FGIDs are a group of disorders characterised by recurrent GI symptoms that cannot be explained by other pathologically-based disease. Of these, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most frequently reported and the most studied. IBS is multifactorial in origin, and may be associated with stress, anxiety or depression, food hypersensitivity, changes in the gut such as an increase in mucosal permeability, and changes in the gut microbiota.   Bidirectional interplay occurs between…

Speakers: Emeran Mayer (USA), Premysl Bercik (Canada)   Prof. Mayer gave an introductory overview of the different aspects of the topic, stressing that the tight interplay between brain, gut and gut microbiota is based on a highly complex network of bidirectional pathways, which run top down (from brain to gut) as well as bottom up (from gut to brain). Prof. Mayer pointed out that the role of the brain in functional bowel disorders has been accepted for quite a long time, while it is only recently that the gastrointestinal (GI) community is beginning to acknowledge that the brain also plays a role in other GI diseases.   However, it remains…

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Latest articles

Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the energy they require to survive, and in exchange they support the physiological, metabolic and immune capacities that have contributed to our evolutionary success. Although currently categorized as an autoimmune disorder and regarded as a complex genetic disease, the ultimate cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains elusive. It seems that interplay…

Speakers: Giovanni Barbara (Italy), Magnus Simren (Sweden)   Prof. Barbara highlighted the fact that there is increasing evidence indicating that the gut microbiota may be involved in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). FGIDs are a group of disorders characterised by recurrent GI symptoms that cannot be explained by other pathologically-based disease. Of these, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most frequently reported and the most studied. IBS is multifactorial in origin, and may be associated with stress, anxiety or depression, food hypersensitivity, changes in the gut such as an increase in mucosal permeability, and changes in the gut microbiota.   Bidirectional interplay occurs between…

Speakers: Emeran Mayer (USA), Premysl Bercik (Canada)   Prof. Mayer gave an introductory overview of the different aspects of the topic, stressing that the tight interplay between brain, gut and gut microbiota is based on a highly complex network of bidirectional pathways, which run top down (from brain to gut) as well as bottom up (from gut to brain). Prof. Mayer pointed out that the role of the brain in functional bowel disorders has been accepted for quite a long time, while it is only recently that the gastrointestinal (GI) community is beginning to acknowledge that the brain also plays a role in other GI diseases.   However, it remains…

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