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Scientists from Brussels University noticed recently in a recent published article that enterotypes could be found also in mice model whatever the genetic background. Although genetic and environmental factor have to be taken in account during any experiment with mice, authors also said that mice enterotypes have also to be controlled. The two first authors of this study, Falk Hildebrand and Anh Nguyen from Raes group, accepted to explain us their interesting finding. Usually, scientist used mice models (wild or knock out strain) to study some effect but few is known actually on the global variation of mice gut microbiome regarding their genetic background and environmental laboratory factor (like cage…

The Second World Summit Gut Microbiota for Health took place in Madrid from the 24th til the 26th of February 2013. In case you weren't able to be present at the time of the summit, we have brought its content to you. You will be able to follow the different parts of the Summit: On Sunday afternoon, we have covered on Twitter with our account @GMFHx using the #GMFH2013 hashtag the general session. Lead experts in the field of Gut Microbiota Research have presented their latest findings from 2pm til 5pm (Madrid, Spain time). This session covered topics on Microbial Ecology, Gut Immunology, Host-Microbe Interaction, Biomarkers, Nutrition and Metabolic Conditions. The…

Though atherosclerosis is an artery problem, microscopic denizens of the intestines may play a surprising role in how the disease plays out. A new study suggests that different mixes of intestinal microbes may determine whether people will have heart attacks or strokes brought on by break-away plaque from the arteries. Compared with healthy people, heart disease patients who have had strokes or other complications of atherosclerosis carry fewer microbes that make anti-inflammatory compounds. These patients also have more bacteria that produce inflammation-triggering molecules, researchers report online December 4 in Nature Communications. Inflammation is thought to promote cardiovascular disease.

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Scientists from Brussels University noticed recently in a recent published article that enterotypes could be found also in mice model whatever the genetic background. Although genetic and environmental factor have to be taken in account during any experiment with mice, authors also said that mice enterotypes have also to be controlled. The two first authors of this study, Falk Hildebrand and Anh Nguyen from Raes group, accepted to explain us their interesting finding. Usually, scientist used mice models (wild or knock out strain) to study some effect but few is known actually on the global variation of mice gut microbiome regarding their genetic background and environmental laboratory factor (like cage…

The Second World Summit Gut Microbiota for Health took place in Madrid from the 24th til the 26th of February 2013. In case you weren't able to be present at the time of the summit, we have brought its content to you. You will be able to follow the different parts of the Summit: On Sunday afternoon, we have covered on Twitter with our account @GMFHx using the #GMFH2013 hashtag the general session. Lead experts in the field of Gut Microbiota Research have presented their latest findings from 2pm til 5pm (Madrid, Spain time). This session covered topics on Microbial Ecology, Gut Immunology, Host-Microbe Interaction, Biomarkers, Nutrition and Metabolic Conditions. The…

Though atherosclerosis is an artery problem, microscopic denizens of the intestines may play a surprising role in how the disease plays out. A new study suggests that different mixes of intestinal microbes may determine whether people will have heart attacks or strokes brought on by break-away plaque from the arteries. Compared with healthy people, heart disease patients who have had strokes or other complications of atherosclerosis carry fewer microbes that make anti-inflammatory compounds. These patients also have more bacteria that produce inflammation-triggering molecules, researchers report online December 4 in Nature Communications. Inflammation is thought to promote cardiovascular disease.

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