Gut brain axis

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"I want to make a difference in the world. Not drag myself from A to B until I die," wrote a sufferer of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)—a condition characterized by symptoms of pain and cramping, bloating, and cycles of diarrhea and/or constipation. It’s a statement of extreme hopelessness. And it comes from a person whose diagnosis is a digestive one.…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

"I want to make a difference in the world. Not drag myself from A to B until I die," wrote a sufferer of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)—a condition characterized by symptoms of pain and cramping, bloating, and cycles of diarrhea and/or constipation. It’s a statement of extreme hopelessness. And it comes from a person whose diagnosis is a digestive one.…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Kristina Campbell is a science writer from British Columbia specialized in communicating about gut microbiota, digestive health and nutrition. She has been part of our Publishing Team since 2014. Kristina has recently published The Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, with foreword from microbiota experts Justin and Erika Sonnenburg. We seized this opportunity to interview Kristina about her book and the experience of…

Lorena Corfas
Lorena Corfas graduated in Journalism and has been working for more than 15 year for companies, organizations and PR agencies in Argentina, Switzerland and Spain. Interested in science and communications, Lorena has been part of the leading team of the Gut Microbiota for Health initiative since it was launched in 2012. Follow her on Twitter: @lorecorfas

Kristina Campbell is a science writer from British Columbia specialized in communicating about gut microbiota, digestive health and nutrition. She has been part of our Publishing Team since 2014. Kristina has recently published The Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, with foreword from microbiota experts Justin and Erika Sonnenburg. We seized this opportunity to interview Kristina about her book and the experience of…

Lorena Corfas
Lorena Corfas graduated in Journalism and has been working for more than 15 year for companies, organizations and PR agencies in Argentina, Switzerland and Spain. Interested in science and communications, Lorena has been part of the leading team of the Gut Microbiota for Health initiative since it was launched in 2012. Follow her on Twitter: @lorecorfas

Right now, nerve cells in your body are passing a certain neurotransmitter—serotonin—back and forth like a chemical basketball. Well-known for its mood-modulating capacity, this chemical is made both in the digestive tract and the brain. And many researchers believe we still haven’t unlocked all its secrets. Elaine Hsiao, a researcher at University of California, Los Angeles (USA), studies serotonin in…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Right now, nerve cells in your body are passing a certain neurotransmitter—serotonin—back and forth like a chemical basketball. Well-known for its mood-modulating capacity, this chemical is made both in the digestive tract and the brain. And many researchers believe we still haven’t unlocked all its secrets. Elaine Hsiao, a researcher at University of California, Los Angeles (USA), studies serotonin in…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The intestines have their own nervous system, the ENS (enteric nervous system), which has over 500 million neurons. Scientists are investigating how ENS nerve cells communicate with brain neurons through the ‘gut-brain axis’. The latest research shows the actions of ENS neurons are affected by events in the gut environment, including the activities of bacteria that dwell there.    …

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The intestines have their own nervous system, the ENS (enteric nervous system), which has over 500 million neurons. Scientists are investigating how ENS nerve cells communicate with brain neurons through the ‘gut-brain axis’. The latest research shows the actions of ENS neurons are affected by events in the gut environment, including the activities of bacteria that dwell there.    …

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team
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Kristina Campbell is a science writer from British Columbia specialized in communicating about gut microbiota, digestive health and nutrition. She has been part of our Publishing Team since 2014. Kristina has recently published The Well-Fed…

Right now, nerve cells in your body are passing a certain neurotransmitter—serotonin—back and forth like a chemical basketball. Well-known for its mood-modulating capacity, this chemical is made both in the digestive tract and the brain.…