Probiotics

News Watch

Akkermansia muciniphila. Despite the tricky moniker, keep this name in mind, because it is the next generation of promising probiotics coming from your gut microbiota. Yes, you have got it right. Recent studies have already shed light on the bunch of positive effects it has on our overall health. For instance, during the last Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Akkermansia muciniphila. Despite the tricky moniker, keep this name in mind, because it is the next generation of promising probiotics coming from your gut microbiota. Yes, you have got it right. Recent studies have already shed light on the bunch of positive effects it has on our overall health. For instance, during the last Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

During the 7th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2018, held in Rome, we had the opportunity to talk to Andrea Hardy, Registered Dietitian from Calgary (Canada), about the role of the dietitians and nutritionists as gut health ambassadors. “I would like to press people to think of gut health as being for everybody," states Hardy. In the interview, the dietitian…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

During the 7th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2018, held in Rome, we had the opportunity to talk to Andrea Hardy, Registered Dietitian from Calgary (Canada), about the role of the dietitians and nutritionists as gut health ambassadors. “I would like to press people to think of gut health as being for everybody," states Hardy. In the interview, the dietitian…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A growing number of scientific studies show diet can affect health through the gut microbiota. “By modulating your diet, you can also modulate your microbes. Microbes can contribute to the severity or the onset of a disease. But if your diet is wrong or unhealthy, that is the first cause,” highlights Clara Belzer. Food and dietary patterns actually have differing…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A growing number of scientific studies show diet can affect health through the gut microbiota. “By modulating your diet, you can also modulate your microbes. Microbes can contribute to the severity or the onset of a disease. But if your diet is wrong or unhealthy, that is the first cause,” highlights Clara Belzer. Food and dietary patterns actually have differing…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A world without bacteria is, simply, unimaginable. Without them we probably wouldn’t be here. They have existed for billions of years and are everywhere, including within us. In fact, the microorganisms in our guts, our gut microbiota, are essential for key functions that help us live in good health. The same could be said for the rest of the animals,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A world without bacteria is, simply, unimaginable. Without them we probably wouldn’t be here. They have existed for billions of years and are everywhere, including within us. In fact, the microorganisms in our guts, our gut microbiota, are essential for key functions that help us live in good health. The same could be said for the rest of the animals,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Fermented foods and gut health are hot topics lately! From sourdough bread to yogurt, fermented foods come in many varieties and flavors. They are also of great interest for our gut microbiota. This Gut Microbiota for Health (GMFH) new infographic walks you through the definition fermented foods and explains how they are made. “Your guide to fermented foods” gives you…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Fermented foods and gut health are hot topics lately! From sourdough bread to yogurt, fermented foods come in many varieties and flavors. They are also of great interest for our gut microbiota. This Gut Microbiota for Health (GMFH) new infographic walks you through the definition fermented foods and explains how they are made. “Your guide to fermented foods” gives you…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

New developments in genetics and metagenomics over the past 15 years have led scientists to produce an in-depth characterization of the composition and function of the gut microbiome as a novel organ in the close intersection between health and disease. As a result, the number of publications discussing the gut microbiota over the past five years represents more than 80%…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

New developments in genetics and metagenomics over the past 15 years have led scientists to produce an in-depth characterization of the composition and function of the gut microbiome as a novel organ in the close intersection between health and disease. As a result, the number of publications discussing the gut microbiota over the past five years represents more than 80%…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Previous data in animals and humans have shown the potential of manipulating the gut microbiome to modify emotional and cognitive behavior and brain function. For instance, Bifidobacterium longum 1714 has been tested for central effects in mice and humans, but studies assessing how probiotics may affect behavior and brain function in healthy volunteers are scarce. A new double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous data in animals and humans have shown the potential of manipulating the gut microbiome to modify emotional and cognitive behavior and brain function. For instance, Bifidobacterium longum 1714 has been tested for central effects in mice and humans, but studies assessing how probiotics may affect behavior and brain function in healthy volunteers are scarce. A new double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

How the gut microbiota can relate to preventing and treating obesity and what are the potential gut microbiota targets in gluten-related disorders were the key subjects discussed in the workshop on nutrition organized by GMFH during the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2018, held in Rome on March 10 and 11. The workshop, called ‘Gut microbiota targets in nutrition’,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

How the gut microbiota can relate to preventing and treating obesity and what are the potential gut microbiota targets in gluten-related disorders were the key subjects discussed in the workshop on nutrition organized by GMFH during the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2018, held in Rome on March 10 and 11. The workshop, called ‘Gut microbiota targets in nutrition’,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Over 300 researchers, physicians, dietitians and other healthcare professionals gathered in Rome (Italy), last March, for the 7th edition of the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2018. They discussed the latest developments in the field of gut microbiota and their application to clinical practice. With Prof. Fernando Azpiroz as Chair of the Scientific Committee, the summit was co-organized by…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Over 300 researchers, physicians, dietitians and other healthcare professionals gathered in Rome (Italy), last March, for the 7th edition of the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2018. They discussed the latest developments in the field of gut microbiota and their application to clinical practice. With Prof. Fernando Azpiroz as Chair of the Scientific Committee, the summit was co-organized by…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It has been suggested that the first 3 years of life are a critical period for dietary interventions aimed at gut microbiota modulation for improving child growth and development—the so-called “window of opportunity for microbial modulation”. Contrary to current belief, recent research has found that the gut microbiome of young children (study; study) and adolescents (study) is different from that…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It has been suggested that the first 3 years of life are a critical period for dietary interventions aimed at gut microbiota modulation for improving child growth and development—the so-called “window of opportunity for microbial modulation”. Contrary to current belief, recent research has found that the gut microbiome of young children (study; study) and adolescents (study) is different from that…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team