Nutrition

News Watch

Ruairi Robertson is nutritionist, microbiologist and neuroscientist, as well as an expert about the link between the gut and the brain. In this talk, held at the TEDxFulbrightSantaMonica event with the title ‘Food for thought: How your belly controls your brain’, Robertson explained how our intestines and the microbes within them can influence both physical and mental health—and most importantly,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Ruairi Robertson is nutritionist, microbiologist and neuroscientist, as well as an expert about the link between the gut and the brain. In this talk, held at the TEDxFulbrightSantaMonica event with the title ‘Food for thought: How your belly controls your brain’, Robertson explained how our intestines and the microbes within them can influence both physical and mental health—and most importantly,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

This video, produced by AsapSCIENCE, a Youtube channel specialising in popularizing science among all types of audiences, shows the existing link between the enteric nervous system, the gut microbiota, and the brain. With “What If You Had A Second Brain?” Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown explain the connection between these two systems with their trademark kinetic typography and drawings.  

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

This video, produced by AsapSCIENCE, a Youtube channel specialising in popularizing science among all types of audiences, shows the existing link between the enteric nervous system, the gut microbiota, and the brain. With “What If You Had A Second Brain?” Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown explain the connection between these two systems with their trademark kinetic typography and drawings.  

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Picture three people seated side-by-side on the airplane. The person in the middle has come down with the flu and spends the two-hour flight coughing, shivering, and drifting in and out of a feverish sleep. The others have good reason to be vexed—indeed, the person on the right ends up with the exact same symptoms the next day. The person…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Picture three people seated side-by-side on the airplane. The person in the middle has come down with the flu and spends the two-hour flight coughing, shivering, and drifting in and out of a feverish sleep. The others have good reason to be vexed—indeed, the person on the right ends up with the exact same symptoms the next day. The person…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Researchers from McMaster University (Canada) had a clear question in mind when they conducted their recent experiment: if a mouse had its gut microbiota altered by antibiotics in early life, what would happen to its brain? The question might have seemed a non-sequitur—why would something that changes the gut have any effect on the brain? Yet the group of researchers,…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Researchers from McMaster University (Canada) had a clear question in mind when they conducted their recent experiment: if a mouse had its gut microbiota altered by antibiotics in early life, what would happen to its brain? The question might have seemed a non-sequitur—why would something that changes the gut have any effect on the brain? Yet the group of researchers,…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The famous analogy for probiotics and prebiotics has to do with growing a patch of grass. For the lushest, greenest grass you can’t just throw some seeds onto dirt; you need fertilizer to create the best conditions for those seeds to grow. Similarly, probiotics (like the seeds) and prebiotics (like the fertilizer) work together to create the best conditions in…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The famous analogy for probiotics and prebiotics has to do with growing a patch of grass. For the lushest, greenest grass you can’t just throw some seeds onto dirt; you need fertilizer to create the best conditions for those seeds to grow. Similarly, probiotics (like the seeds) and prebiotics (like the fertilizer) work together to create the best conditions in…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Research & Practice

When it comes to studying the effects of complex dietary carbohydrates on the gut microbiota, resistant starch (RS) is a type of dietary fibre that is receiving increasing attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the gut microbiota. Although starch is a major energy source in human and animal diets, little is…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

When it comes to studying the effects of complex dietary carbohydrates on the gut microbiota, resistant starch (RS) is a type of dietary fibre that is receiving increasing attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the gut microbiota. Although starch is a major energy source in human and animal diets, little is…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Dietary components’ effects on host health are thought to be mediated in part by their specific effects on the gut microbiome. Probiotics and prebiotics are the most studied substrates, whereas little is known about the impact of dietary fats on the gut microbiome in human cohorts. A new study, led by Dr. Ana M. Valdes from the Faculty of Medicine…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Dietary components’ effects on host health are thought to be mediated in part by their specific effects on the gut microbiome. Probiotics and prebiotics are the most studied substrates, whereas little is known about the impact of dietary fats on the gut microbiome in human cohorts. A new study, led by Dr. Ana M. Valdes from the Faculty of Medicine…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition characterized by systemic inflammation; it is one of the major contributors to neonatal mortality, especially in developing countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 1 million deaths per year (10% of all under-five mortality) are due to neonatal sepsis and that 42% of these deaths occur in the first week of life. Although exclusive…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition characterized by systemic inflammation; it is one of the major contributors to neonatal mortality, especially in developing countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 1 million deaths per year (10% of all under-five mortality) are due to neonatal sepsis and that 42% of these deaths occur in the first week of life. Although exclusive…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

To date, no effective strategy has been identified for reliably preventing the development of eczema and allergy in children at high risk of these conditions. Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is typically one of the first allergic manifestations to appear in infants predisposed to allergic disease. Thus, the condition is of particular interest when it comes to prevention. Since early life gut…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

To date, no effective strategy has been identified for reliably preventing the development of eczema and allergy in children at high risk of these conditions. Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is typically one of the first allergic manifestations to appear in infants predisposed to allergic disease. Thus, the condition is of particular interest when it comes to prevention. Since early life gut…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter