Metabolic Conditions

News Watch

We have known for some time that certain conditions like obesity, cancer and some autoimmune disorders like lupus may cause changes in the composition of our gut microbiota. We did not know, however, which conditions caused more modifications than others, what the effects were and whether these alterations could be used to identify those different illnesses. Two studies led by…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We have known for some time that certain conditions like obesity, cancer and some autoimmune disorders like lupus may cause changes in the composition of our gut microbiota. We did not know, however, which conditions caused more modifications than others, what the effects were and whether these alterations could be used to identify those different illnesses. Two studies led by…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

According to the World Health Organisation, obesity worldwide has nearly doubled since 1980. Every year, this condition kills 3.4 million people, a number that rises every day. Doctors and governments try to combat this epidemic using public awareness campaigns encouraging citizens to stay active and follow a healthy, low-fat diet. While it is not enough, it raises the question what…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

According to the World Health Organisation, obesity worldwide has nearly doubled since 1980. Every year, this condition kills 3.4 million people, a number that rises every day. Doctors and governments try to combat this epidemic using public awareness campaigns encouraging citizens to stay active and follow a healthy, low-fat diet. While it is not enough, it raises the question what…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As we explained in a previous post, many studies have shown that antibiotic treatment alters our gut microbiota. A study led by Spanish scientists now shows that the changes in the composition of bacterial communities found in our intestine caused by prolonged exposure to antibiotics may lead to weight gain. The metabolic activity of the bacteria that live in our…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As we explained in a previous post, many studies have shown that antibiotic treatment alters our gut microbiota. A study led by Spanish scientists now shows that the changes in the composition of bacterial communities found in our intestine caused by prolonged exposure to antibiotics may lead to weight gain. The metabolic activity of the bacteria that live in our…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

“You are not human, you are a walking bacterial colony,” says the Belgian researcher Jeroen Raes, from the Flanders Institute of Biology, in this video from TEDxBrussels. Raes discusses issues that go from the gut microbiota’s size to its functions, as well as its relationship with some of the most prevalent diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. A video that…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

“You are not human, you are a walking bacterial colony,” says the Belgian researcher Jeroen Raes, from the Flanders Institute of Biology, in this video from TEDxBrussels. Raes discusses issues that go from the gut microbiota’s size to its functions, as well as its relationship with some of the most prevalent diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. A video that…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gastric bypass surgery has been revealed as an effective method for fighting morbid obesity, as this kind of intervention usually leads to a significant weight loss. Until now, scientists were not aware of the important role of the gut microbiota in the positive effects of this treatment. According to a recent study published in Science Translational Medicine, the intervention could…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gastric bypass surgery has been revealed as an effective method for fighting morbid obesity, as this kind of intervention usually leads to a significant weight loss. Until now, scientists were not aware of the important role of the gut microbiota in the positive effects of this treatment. According to a recent study published in Science Translational Medicine, the intervention could…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

For those seeking the latest science on gut health and its applications to clinical practice, Paris was the place to be on March 11th and 12th, 2017. At the 6th GMFH World Summit, over 400 professionals from all over the world met to review the past decade of advances in gut microbiota science and where the field is headed in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For those seeking the latest science on gut health and its applications to clinical practice, Paris was the place to be on March 11th and 12th, 2017. At the 6th GMFH World Summit, over 400 professionals from all over the world met to review the past decade of advances in gut microbiota science and where the field is headed in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

After the Human Genome Project success, at the beginning of 21st century, the scientific community agreed the human microbiome was a major challenge in medical research. As many of the bacteria integrating it could not be cultivated in a petri dish in a lab, little was known about this huge community of microorganisms inhabiting our body. It began to be…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

After the Human Genome Project success, at the beginning of 21st century, the scientific community agreed the human microbiome was a major challenge in medical research. As many of the bacteria integrating it could not be cultivated in a petri dish in a lab, little was known about this huge community of microorganisms inhabiting our body. It began to be…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Recent research has shed light on the importance of gut microbiota both during pregnancy and early life. Despite recent research that shows the placenta is not sterile, as previously thought, gut microbiota colonization in the first days and weeks after birth appears to have enormous significance for post-natal life, says Professor Olivier Goulet, from Hospital Necker-Enfants Malades (Paris, France). According…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Recent research has shed light on the importance of gut microbiota both during pregnancy and early life. Despite recent research that shows the placenta is not sterile, as previously thought, gut microbiota colonization in the first days and weeks after birth appears to have enormous significance for post-natal life, says Professor Olivier Goulet, from Hospital Necker-Enfants Malades (Paris, France). According…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The aging process has been previously related to increased levels of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and acute phase proteins in the bloodstream and tissues and to a perturbed gut microbiota. However, the underlying causes of age-associated inflammation remain unclear and it is not known whether this association is correlative or whether the gut microbiota is a cause of age-associated…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The aging process has been previously related to increased levels of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and acute phase proteins in the bloodstream and tissues and to a perturbed gut microbiota. However, the underlying causes of age-associated inflammation remain unclear and it is not known whether this association is correlative or whether the gut microbiota is a cause of age-associated…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados