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In recent years, several studies reported a shift in the intestinal microbiota in humans and mice in response to high-fat diets. This shift is characterised by a reduction of Bacteroidetes and an increase of Firmicutes. The Erysipelotrichi, a bacterial class within the Firmicutes, was shown to be associated with symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, faecal transplantation transmitted the obese…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In recent years, several studies reported a shift in the intestinal microbiota in humans and mice in response to high-fat diets. This shift is characterised by a reduction of Bacteroidetes and an increase of Firmicutes. The Erysipelotrichi, a bacterial class within the Firmicutes, was shown to be associated with symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, faecal transplantation transmitted the obese…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

This comprehensive set of studies, by researchers in Israel, showed that intestinal microbiota in mice and humans show diurnal changes in composition and function. The changes happen on the scale of hours, and are influenced by the host's feeding rhythms. It is already known that chronic jet lag and shift work is associated with dysbiosis. Here, researchers induced jet lag…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

This comprehensive set of studies, by researchers in Israel, showed that intestinal microbiota in mice and humans show diurnal changes in composition and function. The changes happen on the scale of hours, and are influenced by the host's feeding rhythms. It is already known that chronic jet lag and shift work is associated with dysbiosis. Here, researchers induced jet lag…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The 2nd congress on targeting microbiota was held at Institut Pasteur in Paris on October 16-17, 2014. Professor Marvin Edeas, chairman of the scientific committee, warned the attendees about avoiding speculation where the challenge might be prevention instead of finding treatment. This should constitute a step "towards clinical revolution". To introduce this state of the art session, Pierre-Henri Gouyon, French National…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The 2nd congress on targeting microbiota was held at Institut Pasteur in Paris on October 16-17, 2014. Professor Marvin Edeas, chairman of the scientific committee, warned the attendees about avoiding speculation where the challenge might be prevention instead of finding treatment. This should constitute a step "towards clinical revolution". To introduce this state of the art session, Pierre-Henri Gouyon, French National…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Researchers from Israel recently published in Nature how NAS [Non-caloric artificial sweeteners] affect glucose tolerance. In an initial experiment, researchers found mice that consumed water, glucose, or sucrose had comparable glucose tolerance curves, but all 3 mouse groups consuming NAS (either saccharin, sucralose, or aspartame) developed marked glucose intolerance. They focused on saccharin for the next series of experiments, since…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Researchers from Israel recently published in Nature how NAS [Non-caloric artificial sweeteners] affect glucose tolerance. In an initial experiment, researchers found mice that consumed water, glucose, or sucrose had comparable glucose tolerance curves, but all 3 mouse groups consuming NAS (either saccharin, sucralose, or aspartame) developed marked glucose intolerance. They focused on saccharin for the next series of experiments, since…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Numerous commensal bacteria present in the gut microbiota produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA’s) particularly acetate, butyrate and propionate. These SCFA’s have been associated with several biological effects upon host. Growing evidence suggests that specific microbes such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia muciniphila have favorable effects on intestinal inflammation and obesity, respectively (Sokol et al. PNAS 2008, Everard et al.…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Numerous commensal bacteria present in the gut microbiota produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA’s) particularly acetate, butyrate and propionate. These SCFA’s have been associated with several biological effects upon host. Growing evidence suggests that specific microbes such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia muciniphila have favorable effects on intestinal inflammation and obesity, respectively (Sokol et al. PNAS 2008, Everard et al.…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.