Immune Health

News Watch

Researchers from McMaster University (Canada) had a clear question in mind when they conducted their recent experiment: if a mouse had its gut microbiota altered by antibiotics in early life, what would happen to its brain? The question might have seemed a non-sequitur—why would something that changes the gut have any effect on the brain? Yet the group of researchers,…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Researchers from McMaster University (Canada) had a clear question in mind when they conducted their recent experiment: if a mouse had its gut microbiota altered by antibiotics in early life, what would happen to its brain? The question might have seemed a non-sequitur—why would something that changes the gut have any effect on the brain? Yet the group of researchers,…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Every year, 520,000 children under the age of five die worldwide because of acute gastroenteritis. In fact, although often considered a benign disease, gastroenteritis remains a leading cause of paediatric mortality around the globe. And some bacteria such as Salmonella and Escherichia coli are behind between 10 and 20% of gastroenteritis cases in children. Now, a new study in mice…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Every year, 520,000 children under the age of five die worldwide because of acute gastroenteritis. In fact, although often considered a benign disease, gastroenteritis remains a leading cause of paediatric mortality around the globe. And some bacteria such as Salmonella and Escherichia coli are behind between 10 and 20% of gastroenteritis cases in children. Now, a new study in mice…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

From avoiding sushi to obsessive hand-washing, many pregnant women—with good reason—do everything in their power to avoid becoming sick. But when a woman does develop a minor ailment like a cold during pregnancy, she may be strongly tempted to seek out antibiotics—just to be on the safe side. But a new study adds to evidence that this might not be…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

From avoiding sushi to obsessive hand-washing, many pregnant women—with good reason—do everything in their power to avoid becoming sick. But when a woman does develop a minor ailment like a cold during pregnancy, she may be strongly tempted to seek out antibiotics—just to be on the safe side. But a new study adds to evidence that this might not be…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Prepare yourself: You are going to take an exciting and rare tour few humans have ever taken before. In fact, it is a grand tour you cannot access through any travel agency—it’s a journey into the human body. You will be making stops at every place where microorganisms live. They all form what is known as your microbiota. The first…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Prepare yourself: You are going to take an exciting and rare tour few humans have ever taken before. In fact, it is a grand tour you cannot access through any travel agency—it’s a journey into the human body. You will be making stops at every place where microorganisms live. They all form what is known as your microbiota. The first…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Research & Practice

To date, no effective strategy has been identified for reliably preventing the development of eczema and allergy in children at high risk of these conditions. Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is typically one of the first allergic manifestations to appear in infants predisposed to allergic disease. Thus, the condition is of particular interest when it comes to prevention. Since early life gut…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

To date, no effective strategy has been identified for reliably preventing the development of eczema and allergy in children at high risk of these conditions. Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is typically one of the first allergic manifestations to appear in infants predisposed to allergic disease. Thus, the condition is of particular interest when it comes to prevention. Since early life gut…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Previous research has shown antibiotics may increase the risk of immune-related diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by disturbing the composition and functions of the gut microbiota. Although the use of antibiotics during the peripartum period (including both the preterm and post-natal periods) has been suggested as a risk factor for IBD development later in life, little is known about…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown antibiotics may increase the risk of immune-related diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by disturbing the composition and functions of the gut microbiota. Although the use of antibiotics during the peripartum period (including both the preterm and post-natal periods) has been suggested as a risk factor for IBD development later in life, little is known about…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been associated with the onset of several immune- and metabolic-related disorders. The specific role of exogenous factors leading to dysbiosis is still under investigation, and the primary factors contributing to gut microbiome dysbiosis and ultimately to human disease are not clear. A new study, led by Dr. Boakai K. Robertson from the Department of Biological Sciences…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been associated with the onset of several immune- and metabolic-related disorders. The specific role of exogenous factors leading to dysbiosis is still under investigation, and the primary factors contributing to gut microbiome dysbiosis and ultimately to human disease are not clear. A new study, led by Dr. Boakai K. Robertson from the Department of Biological Sciences…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A recent study led by Dr. Luis Fontana (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, Granada, Spain) has found that administration of Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 may downregulate gut inflammatory genes in obese rats. Rats were divided into various…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A recent study led by Dr. Luis Fontana (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, Granada, Spain) has found that administration of Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 may downregulate gut inflammatory genes in obese rats. Rats were divided into various…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Changes in the gut microbiota are involved in both homeostatic and inflammatory immune responses. T regulatory (Treg) immune cells tolerate diverse bacterial communities, whereas inflammatory conditions activate T effector (Teff) immune cells to react against the body’s own commensal microbiota. However, little is known regarding the role of commensal bacteria in inducing Teff cells during inflammation. A new study, led…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Changes in the gut microbiota are involved in both homeostatic and inflammatory immune responses. T regulatory (Treg) immune cells tolerate diverse bacterial communities, whereas inflammatory conditions activate T effector (Teff) immune cells to react against the body’s own commensal microbiota. However, little is known regarding the role of commensal bacteria in inducing Teff cells during inflammation. A new study, led…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados