Gut Microbiota

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Research & Practice

Following our video series from the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2014, here is the interview of Prof. Max Nieuwdorp on the connection between metabolic syndrome and obesity to the gut microbiota.     http://video.gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com/gmfh2014-interviews/Max-Nieuwdorp.mp4

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Following our video series from the Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2014, here is the interview of Prof. Max Nieuwdorp on the connection between metabolic syndrome and obesity to the gut microbiota.     http://video.gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com/gmfh2014-interviews/Max-Nieuwdorp.mp4

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A Nature Medicine paper by Hitesh S Deshmukh and colleagues from the Division of Neonatology, Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsilvania, USA reports an important aspect to the use of antibiotics in the integrity of the immune system in the newborn. Neonatal colonization by microbes, which begins immediately after birth, is influenced by gestational age and the mother’s microbiota and is…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A Nature Medicine paper by Hitesh S Deshmukh and colleagues from the Division of Neonatology, Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsilvania, USA reports an important aspect to the use of antibiotics in the integrity of the immune system in the newborn. Neonatal colonization by microbes, which begins immediately after birth, is influenced by gestational age and the mother’s microbiota and is…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Dr. Tomas de Wouters covered #GMFH2014 the Gut Microbiota for Health Summit which took place from March 8th to March 9th, 2014 in Miami. We have asked him his feedback on the event. You can follow Tomas here on GMFHx.com and on Twitter @tdewouters.   Can you introduce yourself, your work and interest in the gut microbiota? Tomas: Initially trained as a Food Engineer…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Dr. Tomas de Wouters covered #GMFH2014 the Gut Microbiota for Health Summit which took place from March 8th to March 9th, 2014 in Miami. We have asked him his feedback on the event. You can follow Tomas here on GMFHx.com and on Twitter @tdewouters.   Can you introduce yourself, your work and interest in the gut microbiota? Tomas: Initially trained as a Food Engineer…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The workshop entitled "Model Systems to Understand Microbiota-host Interactions" took place in Durham University on April 23-24th 2014. It has been organized by David Weinkove and sponsored by the BBSRC and Durham Biophysical Sciences Institute.     The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together people that use model systems to understand microbiota-host interactions with their "end users",…

François Leulier
Principal Investigator of the Functional genomics of host-intestinal bacteria interactions group at #igfl (@LeulierLab).#Drosophila #microbiota #probiotics

The workshop entitled "Model Systems to Understand Microbiota-host Interactions" took place in Durham University on April 23-24th 2014. It has been organized by David Weinkove and sponsored by the BBSRC and Durham Biophysical Sciences Institute.     The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together people that use model systems to understand microbiota-host interactions with their "end users",…

François Leulier
Principal Investigator of the Functional genomics of host-intestinal bacteria interactions group at #igfl (@LeulierLab).#Drosophila #microbiota #probiotics

At the occasion of the "New therapies in coeliac disease" conference hosted by Columbia University in New-York on March 20, 2014, Dr. Elena Verdú, our expert in Nutrition, is sharing with us the last trends in research in the field of Coeliac Disease (CeD), introducing the idea of a role of probiotics in the treatment of CeD. Presence of intestinal dysbiosis…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

At the occasion of the "New therapies in coeliac disease" conference hosted by Columbia University in New-York on March 20, 2014, Dr. Elena Verdú, our expert in Nutrition, is sharing with us the last trends in research in the field of Coeliac Disease (CeD), introducing the idea of a role of probiotics in the treatment of CeD. Presence of intestinal dysbiosis…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.