Gut Microbiota

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Research & Practice

The gut mobile metagenome comprises mobile genetic element (MGE) like bacterial viruses, known as bacteriophages. Although few studies showed that there is high interpersonal variation, little is known about how the gut microbiota react under phage attacks itselfs. Reyes and colleagues used gnobiotic mouse to improve the understanding of viral-bacterial dynamics. They built an artificial microbiota using 15 bacterial sequenced…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The gut mobile metagenome comprises mobile genetic element (MGE) like bacterial viruses, known as bacteriophages. Although few studies showed that there is high interpersonal variation, little is known about how the gut microbiota react under phage attacks itselfs. Reyes and colleagues used gnobiotic mouse to improve the understanding of viral-bacterial dynamics. They built an artificial microbiota using 15 bacterial sequenced…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The team of Jeffrey Gordon (Ridaura et al. Science 2013) published that the phenotype of obesity (increased adiposity) of an obese twin in a discordant twin pair is transmissible. In other words, they found that mice receiving an obese twin’s fecal microbiota display a greater fat mass than the mice receiving lean twin’s gut microbes. Cohousing is widely used in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

The team of Jeffrey Gordon (Ridaura et al. Science 2013) published that the phenotype of obesity (increased adiposity) of an obese twin in a discordant twin pair is transmissible. In other words, they found that mice receiving an obese twin’s fecal microbiota display a greater fat mass than the mice receiving lean twin’s gut microbes. Cohousing is widely used in…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Some individuals seem to be more susceptible to develop obesity or are more resistant to weight loss during dietary restriction. Emerging evidence suggest that few bacterial genera (i.e., Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia) are inversely associated with obesity, metabolic inflammation and related metabolic disorders in both human and rodent studies. However so far, a common integrative factor is still being…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Some individuals seem to be more susceptible to develop obesity or are more resistant to weight loss during dietary restriction. Emerging evidence suggest that few bacterial genera (i.e., Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia) are inversely associated with obesity, metabolic inflammation and related metabolic disorders in both human and rodent studies. However so far, a common integrative factor is still being…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

  Although there are numerous studies focusing on structure and function of the gut microbiota, very few is known finally regarding the gut microbial colonization and the host homeostasis.  Some studies already focused on the structural dynamics of the early life gut microbiota, but little is known about factor which allows bacteria to establish in the gut and how the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

  Although there are numerous studies focusing on structure and function of the gut microbiota, very few is known finally regarding the gut microbial colonization and the host homeostasis.  Some studies already focused on the structural dynamics of the early life gut microbiota, but little is known about factor which allows bacteria to establish in the gut and how the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As coordinating institute of the MetaHIT consortium and leading expert in gut microbiota research, the French INRA (National Institute for Agricultural Research) has officially inaugurated on July 2nd, 2013 the MetaGenoPolis project. The project receives its €19 million funding from the French Program "Investissements d'Avenir". It is designed as a demonstration initiative, seeking to establish the impact of the gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As coordinating institute of the MetaHIT consortium and leading expert in gut microbiota research, the French INRA (National Institute for Agricultural Research) has officially inaugurated on July 2nd, 2013 the MetaGenoPolis project. The project receives its €19 million funding from the French Program "Investissements d'Avenir". It is designed as a demonstration initiative, seeking to establish the impact of the gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team