Gut Microbiota

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Research & Practice

In this video Dr. Jeffrey Bland discusses recent research into the gut microbiome. Some of the research cited includes work done by the Cleveland Clinic showing certain gut microbiota may convert animal products consumed in the diet into secondary metabolites that are possibly heart-disease inducing (“the Bad”). However, research out of Europe appears to demonstrate particular gut flora may enhance…

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GMFH Editing Team

In this video Dr. Jeffrey Bland discusses recent research into the gut microbiome. Some of the research cited includes work done by the Cleveland Clinic showing certain gut microbiota may convert animal products consumed in the diet into secondary metabolites that are possibly heart-disease inducing (“the Bad”). However, research out of Europe appears to demonstrate particular gut flora may enhance…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has emerged as an effective treatment for Clostridium difficile infections that were stubborn to antibiotic therapy. However, other clinical indications of FMT are receiving an increasing attention due to the relevant roles of the microbiota in the function of the gastrointestinal tract and other aspects of human physiology. In consequence, studies of FMT for recurrent Clostridium…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has emerged as an effective treatment for Clostridium difficile infections that were stubborn to antibiotic therapy. However, other clinical indications of FMT are receiving an increasing attention due to the relevant roles of the microbiota in the function of the gastrointestinal tract and other aspects of human physiology. In consequence, studies of FMT for recurrent Clostridium…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

Here's the report of the “Gut microbiota and management of digestive health” symposium that was held during the UEG Week 2013 in Berlin, Germany, on the 13th of October 2013. Download the report.  

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Here's the report of the “Gut microbiota and management of digestive health” symposium that was held during the UEG Week 2013 in Berlin, Germany, on the 13th of October 2013. Download the report.  

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Sahar El Aidy presented us her recent work about mice colonization as a model to study host-microbial homeostasis dynamics. This work was done under the supervision of Michiel Kleerebezem at Wageningen University (The Netherlands) : 1) What is your background ? I received my BSc degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences at the Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Egypt, my MSc degree…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Sahar El Aidy presented us her recent work about mice colonization as a model to study host-microbial homeostasis dynamics. This work was done under the supervision of Michiel Kleerebezem at Wageningen University (The Netherlands) : 1) What is your background ? I received my BSc degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences at the Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Egypt, my MSc degree…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team