Gut Microbiota

News Watch

As already mentioned on this blog, we are born sterile and our gut microbiota begins to develop at birth. We know that breast milk plays an essential role in the composition of gut microbiota in newborns. Spanish scientists from the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Science (IATA - Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de los Alimentos) and the Center for…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As already mentioned on this blog, we are born sterile and our gut microbiota begins to develop at birth. We know that breast milk plays an essential role in the composition of gut microbiota in newborns. Spanish scientists from the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Science (IATA - Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de los Alimentos) and the Center for…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It is now widely recognized that gut microbiota plays a key role in health and that changes in its composition could be at the origin of several chronic conditions including obesity, diabetes and inflammatory diseases. The composition of the intes healthy adults, however, is more stable compared to the one in children and older people. Moreover, studies have shown that…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

It is now widely recognized that gut microbiota plays a key role in health and that changes in its composition could be at the origin of several chronic conditions including obesity, diabetes and inflammatory diseases. The composition of the intes healthy adults, however, is more stable compared to the one in children and older people. Moreover, studies have shown that…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

After the success of the First Gut Microbiota for Health Summit (Evian, March 2012), the second edition has been planned for February 2013. From the 24th to the 26th of February, Madrid (Spain) will be the capital of gut microbiota. This international event will gather more than 200 scientists from different fields of expertise who are leading the latest discoveries…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

After the success of the First Gut Microbiota for Health Summit (Evian, March 2012), the second edition has been planned for February 2013. From the 24th to the 26th of February, Madrid (Spain) will be the capital of gut microbiota. This international event will gather more than 200 scientists from different fields of expertise who are leading the latest discoveries…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In this interview, Prof. James Versalovic says that, as for the Human Genome Project, we’re only witnessing the first steps of gut microbiota research. In the course of the past few years, the scientific question has evolved from “what bacteria live with us?” to “what do they do?”, a key element when trying to define the gut microbiota as a multi-cellular microbial…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In this interview, Prof. James Versalovic says that, as for the Human Genome Project, we’re only witnessing the first steps of gut microbiota research. In the course of the past few years, the scientific question has evolved from “what bacteria live with us?” to “what do they do?”, a key element when trying to define the gut microbiota as a multi-cellular microbial…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Great projects such as Human Microbiome Project and MetaHIT have arrived to the end in the last two years, but it doesn’t mean research on gut microbiota stops. A second generation of studies has started, evidencing the relevance of this topic. Scientist are focusing on gut microbiota, increasing the current knowledge about its importance and relation with our health and…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Great projects such as Human Microbiome Project and MetaHIT have arrived to the end in the last two years, but it doesn’t mean research on gut microbiota stops. A second generation of studies has started, evidencing the relevance of this topic. Scientist are focusing on gut microbiota, increasing the current knowledge about its importance and relation with our health and…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

Beyond affecting host metabolism, the gut microbiota may be able to shape brain function and behaviour through the microbiota-gut-brain axis. A recent study, led by Dr. John Penders, from the Department of Medical Microbiology at Maastricht University Medical Centre (The Netherlands), has found that gut dysbiosis and gastrointestinal complaints in anorexia nervosa patients do not recover after weight gain and/or…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Beyond affecting host metabolism, the gut microbiota may be able to shape brain function and behaviour through the microbiota-gut-brain axis. A recent study, led by Dr. John Penders, from the Department of Medical Microbiology at Maastricht University Medical Centre (The Netherlands), has found that gut dysbiosis and gastrointestinal complaints in anorexia nervosa patients do not recover after weight gain and/or…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A recent letter published in Nature, by Dr. Trevor Lawley and colleagues from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Hinxton (United Kingdom), has revealed that bacteria from the human intestine that were formerly considered to be unculturable can be grown and characterized phenotypically.   Scientists grew and catalogued more than 130 bacteria from the human intestine that were formerly considered…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A recent letter published in Nature, by Dr. Trevor Lawley and colleagues from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Hinxton (United Kingdom), has revealed that bacteria from the human intestine that were formerly considered to be unculturable can be grown and characterized phenotypically.   Scientists grew and catalogued more than 130 bacteria from the human intestine that were formerly considered…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Research has by now established that microbes are a key part of animal evolution. The ‘hologenome’ model considers the host genome and microbiome combined as a unit of evolution which jointly undergoes selection; the involved microbes can include both pathogens and those that live in a mutualistic symbiosis with the host, called 'symbionts'. A new review by Dr. Michael Shapira…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Research has by now established that microbes are a key part of animal evolution. The ‘hologenome’ model considers the host genome and microbiome combined as a unit of evolution which jointly undergoes selection; the involved microbes can include both pathogens and those that live in a mutualistic symbiosis with the host, called 'symbionts'. A new review by Dr. Michael Shapira…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Antibiotics, while highly effective at treating and preventing infections, may also increase the risk of susceptibility to infections, allergy, and metabolic syndrome and might even decrease efficacy outcomes of pharmacologic therapies by altering the composition and functions of the commensal microbiota.   In a perspective paper published in Science, Dr. Martin Blaser, from the New York University Langone Medical Centre…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Antibiotics, while highly effective at treating and preventing infections, may also increase the risk of susceptibility to infections, allergy, and metabolic syndrome and might even decrease efficacy outcomes of pharmacologic therapies by altering the composition and functions of the commensal microbiota.   In a perspective paper published in Science, Dr. Martin Blaser, from the New York University Langone Medical Centre…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Many living organisms have circadian rhythms—biological processes that oscillate in a pattern following a roughly 24-hour cycle. In humans, researchers have observed the rhythmic expression of 'clock genes', resulting in molecular changes in multiple body tissues; the entire process is coordinated by 'pacemakers' such as the brain's hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. In addition to regulating physiological processes, the host's circadian clock…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Many living organisms have circadian rhythms—biological processes that oscillate in a pattern following a roughly 24-hour cycle. In humans, researchers have observed the rhythmic expression of 'clock genes', resulting in molecular changes in multiple body tissues; the entire process is coordinated by 'pacemakers' such as the brain's hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. In addition to regulating physiological processes, the host's circadian clock…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter