Gut Brain Axis

News Watch

"I want to make a difference in the world. Not drag myself from A to B until I die," wrote a sufferer of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)—a condition characterized by symptoms of pain and cramping, bloating, and cycles of diarrhea and/or constipation. It’s a statement of extreme hopelessness. And it comes from a person whose diagnosis is a digestive one.…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

"I want to make a difference in the world. Not drag myself from A to B until I die," wrote a sufferer of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)—a condition characterized by symptoms of pain and cramping, bloating, and cycles of diarrhea and/or constipation. It’s a statement of extreme hopelessness. And it comes from a person whose diagnosis is a digestive one.…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Kristina Campbell is a science writer from British Columbia specialized in communicating about gut microbiota, digestive health and nutrition. She has been part of our Publishing Team since 2014. Kristina has recently published The Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, with foreword from microbiota experts Justin and Erika Sonnenburg. We seized this opportunity to interview Kristina about her book and the experience of…

Lorena Corfas
Lorena Corfas graduated in Journalism and has been working for more than 15 year for companies, organizations and PR agencies in Argentina, Switzerland and Spain. Interested in science and communications, Lorena has been part of the leading team of the Gut Microbiota for Health initiative since it was launched in 2012. Follow her on Twitter: @lorecorfas

Kristina Campbell is a science writer from British Columbia specialized in communicating about gut microbiota, digestive health and nutrition. She has been part of our Publishing Team since 2014. Kristina has recently published The Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, with foreword from microbiota experts Justin and Erika Sonnenburg. We seized this opportunity to interview Kristina about her book and the experience of…

Lorena Corfas
Lorena Corfas graduated in Journalism and has been working for more than 15 year for companies, organizations and PR agencies in Argentina, Switzerland and Spain. Interested in science and communications, Lorena has been part of the leading team of the Gut Microbiota for Health initiative since it was launched in 2012. Follow her on Twitter: @lorecorfas

Right now, nerve cells in your body are passing a certain neurotransmitter—serotonin—back and forth like a chemical basketball. Well-known for its mood-modulating capacity, this chemical is made both in the digestive tract and the brain. And many researchers believe we still haven’t unlocked all its secrets. Elaine Hsiao, a researcher at University of California, Los Angeles (USA), studies serotonin in…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Right now, nerve cells in your body are passing a certain neurotransmitter—serotonin—back and forth like a chemical basketball. Well-known for its mood-modulating capacity, this chemical is made both in the digestive tract and the brain. And many researchers believe we still haven’t unlocked all its secrets. Elaine Hsiao, a researcher at University of California, Los Angeles (USA), studies serotonin in…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The intestines have their own nervous system, the ENS (enteric nervous system), which has over 500 million neurons. Scientists are investigating how ENS nerve cells communicate with brain neurons through the ‘gut-brain axis’. The latest research shows the actions of ENS neurons are affected by events in the gut environment, including the activities of bacteria that dwell there.    …

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The intestines have their own nervous system, the ENS (enteric nervous system), which has over 500 million neurons. Scientists are investigating how ENS nerve cells communicate with brain neurons through the ‘gut-brain axis’. The latest research shows the actions of ENS neurons are affected by events in the gut environment, including the activities of bacteria that dwell there.    …

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Studies from the past few years have shown gut microbiota is implicated in numerous health conditions, such as obesity, allergies and asthma, as well as colon cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s. Animal studies have shown the key role gut microbiota plays in training and maintaining proper function of the immune system, and also in maintaining good metabolic function. These studies…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Studies from the past few years have shown gut microbiota is implicated in numerous health conditions, such as obesity, allergies and asthma, as well as colon cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s. Animal studies have shown the key role gut microbiota plays in training and maintaining proper function of the immune system, and also in maintaining good metabolic function. These studies…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Research & Practice

Recent research has shown the presence of gut dysbiosis related to a shift in short-chain fatty acids in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Besides this, constipation is a major nonmotor feature of PD and little is known about whether probiotics and prebiotics could improve constipation in patients with PD. A recent randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, led by Dr. Emanuele Cereda…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Recent research has shown the presence of gut dysbiosis related to a shift in short-chain fatty acids in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Besides this, constipation is a major nonmotor feature of PD and little is known about whether probiotics and prebiotics could improve constipation in patients with PD. A recent randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, led by Dr. Emanuele Cereda…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The Gut Microbiota for Health editing team is proud to bring you the latest document in our "Best of" series: Gut Microbiota & Gut-Brain axis! Understanding more about how the gut microbiome influences the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain is poised to change how we think about our mental health. This document, hot off the press, covers…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The Gut Microbiota for Health editing team is proud to bring you the latest document in our "Best of" series: Gut Microbiota & Gut-Brain axis! Understanding more about how the gut microbiome influences the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain is poised to change how we think about our mental health. This document, hot off the press, covers…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an inflammatory condition considered one of the most common forms of senile dementia, and previous research in mice has shown that changes in gut bacteria could enhance inflammation and amyloidosis. Besides this, metabolic alterations such as insulin resistance and glucose metabolism dysregulation and altered lipid metabolism have also been linked to the development of AD. Studies…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an inflammatory condition considered one of the most common forms of senile dementia, and previous research in mice has shown that changes in gut bacteria could enhance inflammation and amyloidosis. Besides this, metabolic alterations such as insulin resistance and glucose metabolism dysregulation and altered lipid metabolism have also been linked to the development of AD. Studies…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Recent research has given important insights into the role of gut microbiota alterations in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although motor deficits (including tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity) are the cardinal symptoms of PD, non-motor symptoms (NMS) (constipation, gastrointestinal disturbances, sleep disturbances and sensory alterations, among others) are also apparent and affect PD patients’ quality of life more negatively than the motor symptoms.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Recent research has given important insights into the role of gut microbiota alterations in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although motor deficits (including tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity) are the cardinal symptoms of PD, non-motor symptoms (NMS) (constipation, gastrointestinal disturbances, sleep disturbances and sensory alterations, among others) are also apparent and affect PD patients’ quality of life more negatively than the motor symptoms.…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It has been reported that nitrate-containing compounds found in certain foods—typically, processed meats, leafy vegetables, chocolate and some wines—as well as food preservatives and nitrate-containing drugs may trigger migraines as a side effect, but the possible mechanistic connection between nitrates, gut microbiome and the likelihood of experiencing migraines is unknown. A recent study, led by Rob Knight from the Department…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It has been reported that nitrate-containing compounds found in certain foods—typically, processed meats, leafy vegetables, chocolate and some wines—as well as food preservatives and nitrate-containing drugs may trigger migraines as a side effect, but the possible mechanistic connection between nitrates, gut microbiome and the likelihood of experiencing migraines is unknown. A recent study, led by Rob Knight from the Department…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados