Gut Brain Axis

News Watch

When you fall in love and you feel butterflies in your stomach; or when you are nervous before an exam and you have a stomachache: gut feelings are real. Although the scientific link between the gut and emotions is unknown, increasing evidence suggests that the microbiota may have a role in gut-brain communication. And now, in healthy humans, researchers have…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

When you fall in love and you feel butterflies in your stomach; or when you are nervous before an exam and you have a stomachache: gut feelings are real. Although the scientific link between the gut and emotions is unknown, increasing evidence suggests that the microbiota may have a role in gut-brain communication. And now, in healthy humans, researchers have…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Alisa had to pack up and move while she was eight months pregnant—a stressful undertaking even without bearing an extra 25 pounds and an inability to tie her own shoes. But luckily, her best friend stepped in. As Alisa reports, “My bestie helped to pack up well over half my house as well as scrubbed the [entire] new home we…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Alisa had to pack up and move while she was eight months pregnant—a stressful undertaking even without bearing an extra 25 pounds and an inability to tie her own shoes. But luckily, her best friend stepped in. As Alisa reports, “My bestie helped to pack up well over half my house as well as scrubbed the [entire] new home we…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Advertisements for the various health benefits of different probiotics —for digestive problems but also beyond the gut— are everywhere these days. But do probiotics really work? A new study published in the journal Gastroenterology showed that a specific probiotic can help to treat symptoms of depression in patients who suffer from a common gastrointestinal disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (or IBS).…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Advertisements for the various health benefits of different probiotics —for digestive problems but also beyond the gut— are everywhere these days. But do probiotics really work? A new study published in the journal Gastroenterology showed that a specific probiotic can help to treat symptoms of depression in patients who suffer from a common gastrointestinal disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (or IBS).…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The past five years have been an especially rapid time of discovery, thanks to scientists studying the gut microbiota and how it influences the gut-brain axis—the two-way communication channel between the digestive tract and the brain. Not only are links being made between gut microbiota composition and conditions like depression and anxiety, but the gut also shows potential for revealing…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The past five years have been an especially rapid time of discovery, thanks to scientists studying the gut microbiota and how it influences the gut-brain axis—the two-way communication channel between the digestive tract and the brain. Not only are links being made between gut microbiota composition and conditions like depression and anxiety, but the gut also shows potential for revealing…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Blurred or double vision; numbness in the arms, legs, or face; problems with balance when walking. These are some of the first symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease that affects 2.3 million people worldwide, most of whom are women around 30 years old. There is currently no cure—nor are the causes known. We do know,…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Blurred or double vision; numbness in the arms, legs, or face; problems with balance when walking. These are some of the first symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease that affects 2.3 million people worldwide, most of whom are women around 30 years old. There is currently no cure—nor are the causes known. We do know,…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Research & Practice

Previous research has shown the aging process and frailty may be associated with a perturbed gut microbiome in elderly people. Indeed, gut microbes could be a major driver of age-associated inflammation in mice, and specific microbial signatures of healthy aging have been previously reported in long-lived individuals. However, it is still unknown whether targeting gut microbes can be effective in…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown the aging process and frailty may be associated with a perturbed gut microbiome in elderly people. Indeed, gut microbes could be a major driver of age-associated inflammation in mice, and specific microbial signatures of healthy aging have been previously reported in long-lived individuals. However, it is still unknown whether targeting gut microbes can be effective in…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been reported as an environmental factor involved in anorexia nervosa (AN) development. A review published in 2015, led by Dr. Cynthia Bulik from Departments of Nutrition and Psychiatry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (North Carolina) and the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics from the Karolinska Institutet (Stockholm, Sweden), has previously reported…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been reported as an environmental factor involved in anorexia nervosa (AN) development. A review published in 2015, led by Dr. Cynthia Bulik from Departments of Nutrition and Psychiatry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (North Carolina) and the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics from the Karolinska Institutet (Stockholm, Sweden), has previously reported…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The intestinal epithelium is considered a novel target for addressing several acute and chronic gastrointestinal conditions. It also could have a potential role in targeting systemic diseases. It is an active component of the mucosal immune system. When considering the complex ecosystem combining the gastrointestinal epithelium, immune cells and resident microbiota, several probiotics like Lactobacillus fermentum exhibit immunoregulatory effects in…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The intestinal epithelium is considered a novel target for addressing several acute and chronic gastrointestinal conditions. It also could have a potential role in targeting systemic diseases. It is an active component of the mucosal immune system. When considering the complex ecosystem combining the gastrointestinal epithelium, immune cells and resident microbiota, several probiotics like Lactobacillus fermentum exhibit immunoregulatory effects in…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous research has shown the aging process and frailty may be associated with a perturbed gut microbiome in elderly people. Indeed, gut microbes could be a major driver of age-associated inflammation in mice, and specific microbial signatures of healthy aging have been previously reported in long-lived individuals. However, it is still unknown whether targeting gut microbes can be effective in…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown the aging process and frailty may be associated with a perturbed gut microbiome in elderly people. Indeed, gut microbes could be a major driver of age-associated inflammation in mice, and specific microbial signatures of healthy aging have been previously reported in long-lived individuals. However, it is still unknown whether targeting gut microbes can be effective in…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although probiotics have been reported to improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), data in humans regarding their effects on psychiatric comorbidities is scarce. A new study, led by Prof. Premysl Bercik from the Department of Medicine at the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at the McMaster University in Hamilton (Canada), has found that the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum NCC3001…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although probiotics have been reported to improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), data in humans regarding their effects on psychiatric comorbidities is scarce. A new study, led by Prof. Premysl Bercik from the Department of Medicine at the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at the McMaster University in Hamilton (Canada), has found that the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum NCC3001…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados