Digestive Health

News Watch

As we have explained before in this blog, breast milk is one major way in which an infant’s gut microbiota starts developing. We now know that an antibody contained in breast milk provides lifelong protection from illnesses such as the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), by setting up defences in the gut flora of breastfed babies. These are the main findings…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As we have explained before in this blog, breast milk is one major way in which an infant’s gut microbiota starts developing. We now know that an antibody contained in breast milk provides lifelong protection from illnesses such as the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), by setting up defences in the gut flora of breastfed babies. These are the main findings…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of The American Academy of Microbiology. It was already known that inflammation played an important role in the development of colorectal…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of The American Academy of Microbiology. It was already known that inflammation played an important role in the development of colorectal…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), probiotics are live microorganisms that, when consumed or administered in adequate amounts, have beneficial effects on the body. Probiotics are also usually used for the prevention and management of digestive symptoms that may be related to changes or an imbalance in the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), probiotics are live microorganisms that, when consumed or administered in adequate amounts, have beneficial effects on the body. Probiotics are also usually used for the prevention and management of digestive symptoms that may be related to changes or an imbalance in the…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Functional disorders are those in which the parameters of analyses and tests are normal, even though people may be suffering from pain or other symptoms. According to what Prof. Magnus Simren, chairman of the United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Scientific Committee, tells us in this interview, this kind of disorder frequently affects the digestive system. This video discusses the relationship that…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Functional disorders are those in which the parameters of analyses and tests are normal, even though people may be suffering from pain or other symptoms. According to what Prof. Magnus Simren, chairman of the United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Scientific Committee, tells us in this interview, this kind of disorder frequently affects the digestive system. This video discusses the relationship that…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Abdominal gases are created in the intestine during digestion and, beyond the jokes that this subject usually generates, it is an absolutely normal physiological process. In some cases, however, abdominal gases can be a source of discomfort. This situation may now have a scientific explanation. A study by the Physiology and Pathophysiology of the Digestive Tract Group at Vall d’Hebron…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Abdominal gases are created in the intestine during digestion and, beyond the jokes that this subject usually generates, it is an absolutely normal physiological process. In some cases, however, abdominal gases can be a source of discomfort. This situation may now have a scientific explanation. A study by the Physiology and Pathophysiology of the Digestive Tract Group at Vall d’Hebron…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

Gut Microbiota for Health’s gastroenterology e-learning course on the gut microbiota now has a new home! This 1-hour video course, which covers evidence on the role of the gut microbiota in normal gut function and in gastrointestinal disease, will now join the collection of material for continuing medical education available through United European Gastroenterology (UEG). This clinically-oriented summary of gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut Microbiota for Health’s gastroenterology e-learning course on the gut microbiota now has a new home! This 1-hour video course, which covers evidence on the role of the gut microbiota in normal gut function and in gastrointestinal disease, will now join the collection of material for continuing medical education available through United European Gastroenterology (UEG). This clinically-oriented summary of gut…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The intestinal microbiota appears to be a key determinant of health and disease. Indeed, microbiota differences are associated with a number of inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the method by which alterations in the microbiota composition (influenced by genetics, the environment, and diet) contribute to IBD pathogenesis is not well understood. In a recently published paper in…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The intestinal microbiota appears to be a key determinant of health and disease. Indeed, microbiota differences are associated with a number of inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the method by which alterations in the microbiota composition (influenced by genetics, the environment, and diet) contribute to IBD pathogenesis is not well understood. In a recently published paper in…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Lactose intolerance is a form of lactose maldigestion where individuals experience symptoms such as diarrhoea, abdominal cramping, flatulence, vomiting, and bowel sounds following lactose consumption. An estimated 30% of the population from the United States and Mediterranean countries may suffer from this condition, although lactose intolerance prevalence is lower in northern European countries and higher in African and Asian countries.…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Lactose intolerance is a form of lactose maldigestion where individuals experience symptoms such as diarrhoea, abdominal cramping, flatulence, vomiting, and bowel sounds following lactose consumption. An estimated 30% of the population from the United States and Mediterranean countries may suffer from this condition, although lactose intolerance prevalence is lower in northern European countries and higher in African and Asian countries.…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition involving an immune reaction that is triggered by dietary gluten, found in wheat, barley and rye. Partially digested gluten peptides can trigger symptoms in genetically susceptible individuals, expressing HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 genes. While necessary for disease development, the expression of DQ2/DQ8 is not sufficient for disease development, suggesting a critical role for environmental factors.…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition involving an immune reaction that is triggered by dietary gluten, found in wheat, barley and rye. Partially digested gluten peptides can trigger symptoms in genetically susceptible individuals, expressing HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 genes. While necessary for disease development, the expression of DQ2/DQ8 is not sufficient for disease development, suggesting a critical role for environmental factors.…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) refers to a condition in which abnormally large numbers of bacteria are present in the small intestine. Gastrointestinal cancer is related to compromised intestinal barrier function, reduced functionality of immune responses, and inadequate nutritional status, which impair the ability of patients to control intestinal bacterial proliferation. These result in conditions favourable to SIBO. However, the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) refers to a condition in which abnormally large numbers of bacteria are present in the small intestine. Gastrointestinal cancer is related to compromised intestinal barrier function, reduced functionality of immune responses, and inadequate nutritional status, which impair the ability of patients to control intestinal bacterial proliferation. These result in conditions favourable to SIBO. However, the…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.