Digestive Health

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Professor Barbara’s main scientific interest is in functional gastrointestinal disorders, including constipation, irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhea. These conditions have been considered for a long time mood disorders. However, there is clear recognition that peripheral and environmental factors as well as the intestinal microbiota participate to their pathophysiology. Subsets of patients develop these condition after a bout of infectious gastroenteritis,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Professor Barbara’s main scientific interest is in functional gastrointestinal disorders, including constipation, irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhea. These conditions have been considered for a long time mood disorders. However, there is clear recognition that peripheral and environmental factors as well as the intestinal microbiota participate to their pathophysiology. Subsets of patients develop these condition after a bout of infectious gastroenteritis,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Catherine Juste studied agronomic engineering, and then became Doctor of Science, specializing in nutrition and physiology. She became passionate about environmental microbiology and is currently developing environmental proteomics of the gut microbes at INRA. She developed an innovative preparative pipeline to explore myriads of bacterial proteins that are expressed in the lumen gut of human hosts, and that may have…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Catherine Juste studied agronomic engineering, and then became Doctor of Science, specializing in nutrition and physiology. She became passionate about environmental microbiology and is currently developing environmental proteomics of the gut microbes at INRA. She developed an innovative preparative pipeline to explore myriads of bacterial proteins that are expressed in the lumen gut of human hosts, and that may have…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Outnumbering our own cells more than 10 to one, the microbes thriving peacefully in the human body help keep us healthy. Recently, research findings have showed that microbial guests may also aid in the treatment of disease. Some of those studies were summarised by Elisabeth Pennisi in the “News and analysis” section of the Science Magazine, in an article titled…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Outnumbering our own cells more than 10 to one, the microbes thriving peacefully in the human body help keep us healthy. Recently, research findings have showed that microbial guests may also aid in the treatment of disease. Some of those studies were summarised by Elisabeth Pennisi in the “News and analysis” section of the Science Magazine, in an article titled…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Until now, the role of specific gut microbes in shaping body composition was poorly understood. A new study carried out by researchers in the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis clarified how diet and gut microbes interact to affect weight gain.   In this study, Ridaura and colleagues transplanted intact uncultured fecal microbiota from adult female twin pairs…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Until now, the role of specific gut microbes in shaping body composition was poorly understood. A new study carried out by researchers in the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis clarified how diet and gut microbes interact to affect weight gain.   In this study, Ridaura and colleagues transplanted intact uncultured fecal microbiota from adult female twin pairs…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

Machiels et al. recently described that the composition of the faecal microbiota of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis differs from that of healthy individuals: they found a reduction in two well-known butyrate-producing bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, Roseburia hominis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. This has been confirmed in other studies. The dysbiosis found in the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) i.e. Crohn’s…

Philippe Marteau
Gastroenterologist, Head of the Medico-surgical department of Hepato-gastroenterology, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris. Professor of gastroenterology at Paris 7 University. Philippe Marteau received his PhD from the University Paris XI, France, in 1994. His main research interest is Physiopathology of the human intestinal ecosystem (intestinal microbiota in health and disease): role of the ecosystem in the development of intestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis...) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); treatment or prevention (1st axis: description of the ecosystem in different physiological situations and pathological conditions -inflammatory bowel disease, cancers, polyps- / 2nd axis: modulation of the ecosystem using probiotics, prebiotics or other food substrates). Philippe Marteau has published >270 publications in peer reviewed scientific journals. He is member of the French Society of Gastroenterology, ECCO and of IOIBD (International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases), GETAID. He is president of the French “Collégiale des Universitaires d’Hépatogastroentérologie”. He has been principal investigator of several randomized controlled trials using drugs or probiotics in the treatment of various gastrointestinal diseases, especially inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.