Digestive Health

News Watch

In the past decades, some studies have shed light on the importance of diet in reducing the risk of cancer. More and more evidence is accumulating that gut microbiota could be involved in this relationship between food and disease. A senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute (USA), Rashmi Sinha studies the link between what we eat, our health and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

In the past decades, some studies have shed light on the importance of diet in reducing the risk of cancer. More and more evidence is accumulating that gut microbiota could be involved in this relationship between food and disease. A senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute (USA), Rashmi Sinha studies the link between what we eat, our health and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

For one individual, the culprit might be peanut butter. For another, it might be fried chicken. Foods that trigger symptoms are well identified by those who suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)—a functional disorder based on gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms that might include abdominal pain, bloating, gas, constipation, or diarrhea. Scientifically, it has proven more difficult to identify dietary patterns that…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

For one individual, the culprit might be peanut butter. For another, it might be fried chicken. Foods that trigger symptoms are well identified by those who suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)—a functional disorder based on gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms that might include abdominal pain, bloating, gas, constipation, or diarrhea. Scientifically, it has proven more difficult to identify dietary patterns that…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

May 29th, 2016, is World Digestive Health Day! This year, the occasion brings a chance for the World Gastroenterology Organisation to raise awareness on the relationship between diet and gastrointestinal health. The way in which your diet impacts your health is under active investigation by researchers around the world, and recent work suggests knowledge about the gut microbiota is critical…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

May 29th, 2016, is World Digestive Health Day! This year, the occasion brings a chance for the World Gastroenterology Organisation to raise awareness on the relationship between diet and gastrointestinal health. The way in which your diet impacts your health is under active investigation by researchers around the world, and recent work suggests knowledge about the gut microbiota is critical…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In Western countries an average of 2 in 100,000 children aged between 10 and 19 years suffer from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), a broader term (as already explained on this blog) for Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. And experts are warning that the number of cases of this condition is on the rise.   Once diagnosed, children face a lifetime…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

In Western countries an average of 2 in 100,000 children aged between 10 and 19 years suffer from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), a broader term (as already explained on this blog) for Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. And experts are warning that the number of cases of this condition is on the rise.   Once diagnosed, children face a lifetime…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Stomach pain, flatulence, bloating, discomfort. These are just some of the symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), a chronic condition affecting more than 10% of the population with highest impact in women. Treatment cannot cure the condition, only alleviate the symptoms. Its origin is unknown, although increasingly more researchers suspect that imbalances in the gut microbiota may play a major…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Stomach pain, flatulence, bloating, discomfort. These are just some of the symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), a chronic condition affecting more than 10% of the population with highest impact in women. Treatment cannot cure the condition, only alleviate the symptoms. Its origin is unknown, although increasingly more researchers suspect that imbalances in the gut microbiota may play a major…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Research & Practice

Previous research has shown that the mechanisms of drug action such as chemopreventive activity of celecoxib and effects of metformin in type 2 diabetes patients appear to be shaped by gut microbial communities. A recent study, led by Dr. Laurence Zitvogel from the Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus in Villejuif (France), has found that the antitumoral efficacy of…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that the mechanisms of drug action such as chemopreventive activity of celecoxib and effects of metformin in type 2 diabetes patients appear to be shaped by gut microbial communities. A recent study, led by Dr. Laurence Zitvogel from the Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus in Villejuif (France), has found that the antitumoral efficacy of…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Gastrointestinal discomfort includes different digestive symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, borborygmi (rumbling) and flatulence, which may impact quality of life among the general population. Probiotics can potentially improve gut function through several mechanisms and they may be an effective therapy for those with irritable bowel syndrome. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis, led by Julie Glanville from the York…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Gastrointestinal discomfort includes different digestive symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, borborygmi (rumbling) and flatulence, which may impact quality of life among the general population. Probiotics can potentially improve gut function through several mechanisms and they may be an effective therapy for those with irritable bowel syndrome. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis, led by Julie Glanville from the York…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Dietary fibre from plant-based foods is the most common fuel for some bacterial species in the gut microbiota and in some contexts has been shown to play a key role in protecting the host against immune-mediated diseases such food allergies and even neurological disorders. A diet rich in microbiota-accessible carbohydrates (MACs), which are complex carbohydrates found in fruits, vegetables, whole…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Dietary fibre from plant-based foods is the most common fuel for some bacterial species in the gut microbiota and in some contexts has been shown to play a key role in protecting the host against immune-mediated diseases such food allergies and even neurological disorders. A diet rich in microbiota-accessible carbohydrates (MACs), which are complex carbohydrates found in fruits, vegetables, whole…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder in western societies and recent research has proposed gut microbiota as one of the potential main factors involved. However, little is known regarding the relationship between the composition and function of the gut microbiota and clinical symptoms of IBS. A recent study, led by Prof. Magnus Simrén from the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder in western societies and recent research has proposed gut microbiota as one of the potential main factors involved. However, little is known regarding the relationship between the composition and function of the gut microbiota and clinical symptoms of IBS. A recent study, led by Prof. Magnus Simrén from the…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Scientific evidence shows probiotics may have a role in treating acute infectious diarrhoea and preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. However, little is known regarding their role in the treatment of diarrhoea generated as a result of radiotherapy or chemotherapy treatments. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis, led by Dr. C-X Pei from The First Clinical Medical College and Evidence Based Medical Centre…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Scientific evidence shows probiotics may have a role in treating acute infectious diarrhoea and preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. However, little is known regarding their role in the treatment of diarrhoea generated as a result of radiotherapy or chemotherapy treatments. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis, led by Dr. C-X Pei from The First Clinical Medical College and Evidence Based Medical Centre…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.