Category : Obesity

Previous evidence from both mouse models and humans has suggested that manipulation of the gut microbiota could help us understand how to deal with the current global obesity epidemic. However, whether the effects of targeting the gut microbiota are due to improved health status in people with overweight or obesity or the result of changes in their gut microbiota composition…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous evidence from both mouse models and humans has suggested that manipulation of the gut microbiota could help us understand how to deal with the current global obesity epidemic. However, whether the effects of targeting the gut microbiota are due to improved health status in people with overweight or obesity or the result of changes in their gut microbiota composition…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

It has been suggested that there is a relationship between dietary patterns, gut microbiota and the development of obesity; one of the leading theories is based on altered permeability of the gut barrier as a key factor in triggering obesity. However, the vast majority of research about the role of gut microbial communities in obesity has focused on bacteria, and…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It has been suggested that there is a relationship between dietary patterns, gut microbiota and the development of obesity; one of the leading theories is based on altered permeability of the gut barrier as a key factor in triggering obesity. However, the vast majority of research about the role of gut microbial communities in obesity has focused on bacteria, and…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Gut Microbiota for Health is pleased to announce its participation at the 21st International Congress of Nutrition (ICN).  Organized by the International Union of Nutritional Sciences (IUNS) with the theme “From Sciences to Nutrition Security”, the event will take place at the Hotel Sheraton, Buenos Aires (Argentina) from October 15th to 20th, 2017. IUNS promotes advancement in nutrition science, research,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut Microbiota for Health is pleased to announce its participation at the 21st International Congress of Nutrition (ICN).  Organized by the International Union of Nutritional Sciences (IUNS) with the theme “From Sciences to Nutrition Security”, the event will take place at the Hotel Sheraton, Buenos Aires (Argentina) from October 15th to 20th, 2017. IUNS promotes advancement in nutrition science, research,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been associated with the onset of several immune- and metabolic-related disorders. The specific role of exogenous factors leading to dysbiosis is still under investigation, and the primary factors contributing to gut microbiome dysbiosis and ultimately to human disease are not clear. A new study, led by Dr. Boakai K. Robertson from the Department of Biological Sciences…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been associated with the onset of several immune- and metabolic-related disorders. The specific role of exogenous factors leading to dysbiosis is still under investigation, and the primary factors contributing to gut microbiome dysbiosis and ultimately to human disease are not clear. A new study, led by Dr. Boakai K. Robertson from the Department of Biological Sciences…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

For those seeking the latest science on gut health and its applications to clinical practice, Paris was the place to be on March 11th and 12th, 2017. At the 6th GMFH World Summit, over 400 professionals from all over the world met to review the past decade of advances in gut microbiota science and where the field is headed in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For those seeking the latest science on gut health and its applications to clinical practice, Paris was the place to be on March 11th and 12th, 2017. At the 6th GMFH World Summit, over 400 professionals from all over the world met to review the past decade of advances in gut microbiota science and where the field is headed in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

After the Human Genome Project success, at the beginning of 21st century, the scientific community agreed the human microbiome was a major challenge in medical research. As many of the bacteria integrating it could not be cultivated in a petri dish in a lab, little was known about this huge community of microorganisms inhabiting our body. It began to be…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

After the Human Genome Project success, at the beginning of 21st century, the scientific community agreed the human microbiome was a major challenge in medical research. As many of the bacteria integrating it could not be cultivated in a petri dish in a lab, little was known about this huge community of microorganisms inhabiting our body. It began to be…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut microbiota dysbiosis, which has been defined as “the altered proportion and activity of bacterial groups of gut microbiota”, is suspected to be involved in several metabolic diseases such as hepatic steatosis, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. However, the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. In a recent study, led by Dr. Matteo Serino from the Institut Nacional…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Gut microbiota dysbiosis, which has been defined as “the altered proportion and activity of bacterial groups of gut microbiota”, is suspected to be involved in several metabolic diseases such as hepatic steatosis, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. However, the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. In a recent study, led by Dr. Matteo Serino from the Institut Nacional…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Childhood obesity is increasing worldwide and it has been reported that associations between appetite and adiposity are consistent with a behavioural susceptibility model of obesity. Prebiotics have been shown to decrease food intake and reduce body fat in overweight and obese adults. A previous study has shown that a diet rich in non-digestible carbohydrates may modulate gut microbiota and alleviate…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Childhood obesity is increasing worldwide and it has been reported that associations between appetite and adiposity are consistent with a behavioural susceptibility model of obesity. Prebiotics have been shown to decrease food intake and reduce body fat in overweight and obese adults. A previous study has shown that a diet rich in non-digestible carbohydrates may modulate gut microbiota and alleviate…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados