Category : Inflammation

A carbohydrate-restricted diet has been emerging as an effective dietary intervention for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in humans. NAFLD is the most prevalent form of liver disease in western countries, affecting an estimated up to 30% of the population and has been reported to be an independent risk factor for increased mortality related to cardiovascular and liver diseases. However,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A carbohydrate-restricted diet has been emerging as an effective dietary intervention for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in humans. NAFLD is the most prevalent form of liver disease in western countries, affecting an estimated up to 30% of the population and has been reported to be an independent risk factor for increased mortality related to cardiovascular and liver diseases. However,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although recent research in humans has found that the gut microbiota follows a circadian rhythm in vitro and responds to fluctuations in the hormone melatonin, further studies in humans related to the circadian rhythms in vivo are necessary and the exact mechanisms accounting for the observed bacterial rhythms have not been shown yet. Moreover, the impact of timing of food…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Although recent research in humans has found that the gut microbiota follows a circadian rhythm in vitro and responds to fluctuations in the hormone melatonin, further studies in humans related to the circadian rhythms in vivo are necessary and the exact mechanisms accounting for the observed bacterial rhythms have not been shown yet. Moreover, the impact of timing of food…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Gut Microbiota for Health is pleased to announce its participation at the 21st International Congress of Nutrition (ICN).  Organized by the International Union of Nutritional Sciences (IUNS) with the theme “From Sciences to Nutrition Security”, the event will take place at the Hotel Sheraton, Buenos Aires (Argentina) from October 15th to 20th, 2017. IUNS promotes advancement in nutrition science, research,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut Microbiota for Health is pleased to announce its participation at the 21st International Congress of Nutrition (ICN).  Organized by the International Union of Nutritional Sciences (IUNS) with the theme “From Sciences to Nutrition Security”, the event will take place at the Hotel Sheraton, Buenos Aires (Argentina) from October 15th to 20th, 2017. IUNS promotes advancement in nutrition science, research,…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A recent study led by Dr. Luis Fontana (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, Granada, Spain) has found that administration of Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 may downregulate gut inflammatory genes in obese rats. Rats were divided into various…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

A recent study led by Dr. Luis Fontana (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, Granada, Spain) has found that administration of Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 may downregulate gut inflammatory genes in obese rats. Rats were divided into various…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For those seeking the latest science on gut health and its applications to clinical practice, Paris was the place to be on March 11th and 12th, 2017. At the 6th GMFH World Summit, over 400 professionals from all over the world met to review the past decade of advances in gut microbiota science and where the field is headed in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For those seeking the latest science on gut health and its applications to clinical practice, Paris was the place to be on March 11th and 12th, 2017. At the 6th GMFH World Summit, over 400 professionals from all over the world met to review the past decade of advances in gut microbiota science and where the field is headed in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

The aging process has been previously related to increased levels of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and acute phase proteins in the bloodstream and tissues and to a perturbed gut microbiota. However, the underlying causes of age-associated inflammation remain unclear and it is not known whether this association is correlative or whether the gut microbiota is a cause of age-associated…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The aging process has been previously related to increased levels of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and acute phase proteins in the bloodstream and tissues and to a perturbed gut microbiota. However, the underlying causes of age-associated inflammation remain unclear and it is not known whether this association is correlative or whether the gut microbiota is a cause of age-associated…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that gut microbiota dysbiosis may be involved in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), which is a chronic inflammatory disease that mainly affects the sacroiliac joints and spine. However, the implications it could have for both local and systemic immune responses in AS has not yet been explored. A recent study, led by Dr. Giovanni Triolo…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that gut microbiota dysbiosis may be involved in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), which is a chronic inflammatory disease that mainly affects the sacroiliac joints and spine. However, the implications it could have for both local and systemic immune responses in AS has not yet been explored. A recent study, led by Dr. Giovanni Triolo…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A recent study (Chassaing, et al.) showed that two dietary emulsifiers -- carboxymethylcellulose and polysorbate-80 -- induced gut microbiota alteration and gut barrier dysfunction in mice, resulting in weight gain, low-grade inflammation, and metabolic disorders. While it is unlikely that emulsifiers in processed foods are uniquely responsible for the human pandemic of obesity and inflammatory diseases, we cannot rule out…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

A recent study (Chassaing, et al.) showed that two dietary emulsifiers -- carboxymethylcellulose and polysorbate-80 -- induced gut microbiota alteration and gut barrier dysfunction in mice, resulting in weight gain, low-grade inflammation, and metabolic disorders. While it is unlikely that emulsifiers in processed foods are uniquely responsible for the human pandemic of obesity and inflammatory diseases, we cannot rule out…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.