Category : Gut Microbiota Composition

Previous research has found that the gut microbiome modulates both immune system development and gut homeostasis through its interaction with the host immune cells. Although both innate and adaptive humoral responses target distinct commensal bacteria via mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), little is known about whether secretory immunoglobulin M (SIgM) is also involved. A new study, led by Dr. Andrea…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has found that the gut microbiome modulates both immune system development and gut homeostasis through its interaction with the host immune cells. Although both innate and adaptive humoral responses target distinct commensal bacteria via mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), little is known about whether secretory immunoglobulin M (SIgM) is also involved. A new study, led by Dr. Andrea…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that a primary function of the gut microbiome is providing colonization resistance against many orally acquired pathogens; several exogenous factors, such as antibiotic treatments, could reduce host resistance to infections. The potential for manipulating the gut microbiome in the context of travellers’ health has not been previously explored in depth in a scientific review. A 2016…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that a primary function of the gut microbiome is providing colonization resistance against many orally acquired pathogens; several exogenous factors, such as antibiotic treatments, could reduce host resistance to infections. The potential for manipulating the gut microbiome in the context of travellers’ health has not been previously explored in depth in a scientific review. A 2016…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research from the two largest cohorts to date has shown that diet is one of the primary factors involved in gut microbiome variation among healthy individuals. Regarding bread type, little is known about how interpersonal variation affects clinical and microbiome-related responses. A new study, led by Dr. Avraham Levy, Dr Eran Elinav and Dr. Eran Segal from the Department…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research from the two largest cohorts to date has shown that diet is one of the primary factors involved in gut microbiome variation among healthy individuals. Regarding bread type, little is known about how interpersonal variation affects clinical and microbiome-related responses. A new study, led by Dr. Avraham Levy, Dr Eran Elinav and Dr. Eran Segal from the Department…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It is well-known that medications could affect the microbiome and therefore host-microbiota interactions are considered a confounding factor that can contribute to therapeutic and side effects of drug treatments. Previous research has shown that gut microbiota may partially mediate both therapeutic and adverse effects of metformin, which is the most prescribed drug for the treatment of individuals with type 2…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

It is well-known that medications could affect the microbiome and therefore host-microbiota interactions are considered a confounding factor that can contribute to therapeutic and side effects of drug treatments. Previous research has shown that gut microbiota may partially mediate both therapeutic and adverse effects of metformin, which is the most prescribed drug for the treatment of individuals with type 2…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

For those seeking the latest science on gut health and its applications to clinical practice, Paris was the place to be on March 11th and 12th, 2017. At the 6th GMFH World Summit, over 400 professionals from all over the world met to review the past decade of advances in gut microbiota science and where the field is headed in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For those seeking the latest science on gut health and its applications to clinical practice, Paris was the place to be on March 11th and 12th, 2017. At the 6th GMFH World Summit, over 400 professionals from all over the world met to review the past decade of advances in gut microbiota science and where the field is headed in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Public awareness about the importance of the gut microbiota is growing, but many nutrition professionals struggle to know how to incorporate findings from gut microbiota science into their practice. In a rapidly-progressing field, what should clinicians know about how gut microbes and diet interact to produce different health outcomes? At the 2017 Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit in Paris…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Public awareness about the importance of the gut microbiota is growing, but many nutrition professionals struggle to know how to incorporate findings from gut microbiota science into their practice. In a rapidly-progressing field, what should clinicians know about how gut microbes and diet interact to produce different health outcomes? At the 2017 Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit in Paris…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Bacteria are responsive to the environment within the mammalian gut. Scientists have long desired to harness bacteria to detect disease or therapeutically influence the gut environment, but to date, synthetic genetic circuits in bacteria have proven susceptible to mutation and unpredictable function when they colonize the gut for an extended period of time. New work, led by Pamela Silver of…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Bacteria are responsive to the environment within the mammalian gut. Scientists have long desired to harness bacteria to detect disease or therapeutically influence the gut environment, but to date, synthetic genetic circuits in bacteria have proven susceptible to mutation and unpredictable function when they colonize the gut for an extended period of time. New work, led by Pamela Silver of…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is currently investigated as a novel treatment option for several chronic diseases related to gut dysbiosis with the strongest evidence for efficacy in the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Although clear reporting of FMT methodology is important to better understand and reproduce studies, reports of the methodological components of FMT interventions in clinical trials vary…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is currently investigated as a novel treatment option for several chronic diseases related to gut dysbiosis with the strongest evidence for efficacy in the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Although clear reporting of FMT methodology is important to better understand and reproduce studies, reports of the methodological components of FMT interventions in clinical trials vary…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

In the new Gut Microbiota for Health “Clinical Minute” series, we get a scientific expert’s take on gut-microbiota-related questions of interest to healthcare professionals. TOPIC: Should probiotics be used for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection? Dr. Nicole T. Shen is a first year gastroenterology and hepatology fellow in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Weill Department of Medicine, Weill…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In the new Gut Microbiota for Health “Clinical Minute” series, we get a scientific expert’s take on gut-microbiota-related questions of interest to healthcare professionals. TOPIC: Should probiotics be used for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection? Dr. Nicole T. Shen is a first year gastroenterology and hepatology fellow in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Weill Department of Medicine, Weill…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.

Conditions that represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide—including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancers—are linked with observable changes in the human gut microbiota. And many other chronic conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, asthma and allergies, rheumatoid arthritis, and even myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), have also been linked with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Scientists and the public have…

Patrice D. Cani
Professor Patrice D. Cani is researcher from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS), group leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI) from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and WELBIO (Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and BIOtechnology) investigator. He is currently member of several international associations, he is member of the Alumni College from the Royal Belgian Academy of Sciences, and he has been elected in the board of directors of the LDRI (UCL). Patrice D. Cani has a M.Sc. in Nutrition and another M.Sc. in health Sciences, he is registered dietitian and PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His main research interests are the investigation of the role of the gut microbiota in the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and low grade inflammation. More specifically, he is investigating the interactions between the gut microbiota, the host and specific biological systems such as the endocannabinoid system and the innate immune system in the context of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic inflammation. Prof Cani is author and co-author of more than 110 scientific research papers published in peer-reviewed international journals, conferences and book chapters.