Category : Gut Microbiota

Despite previous research indicating the role of gut microbiota in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the involved mechanisms have not been adequately addressed in model systems. Anecdotal evidence suggests that amyloid plaque formation in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice differs among mouse facilities with different specific-pathogen-free conditions, leading some to wonder whether the gut microbiota (as shaped by environment) influences these amyloid…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Despite previous research indicating the role of gut microbiota in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the involved mechanisms have not been adequately addressed in model systems. Anecdotal evidence suggests that amyloid plaque formation in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice differs among mouse facilities with different specific-pathogen-free conditions, leading some to wonder whether the gut microbiota (as shaped by environment) influences these amyloid…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous research has shown that chemical and physical stress are major influencers of the physiology and ecology of the all microbes that have coevolved with a host. However, the physiologic effects of gut microbiome responses to physiologic stress have been poorly studied in humans. A recent study, led by Dr. Stefan Pasiakos from the Military Nutrition Division at the United…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous research has shown that chemical and physical stress are major influencers of the physiology and ecology of the all microbes that have coevolved with a host. However, the physiologic effects of gut microbiome responses to physiologic stress have been poorly studied in humans. A recent study, led by Dr. Stefan Pasiakos from the Military Nutrition Division at the United…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Recent research has studied the role of the gut microbiome in modulating risk of several metabolic and immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune psoriasis and arthritis, and cancer. Although it is a well-known fact that diet is a major player in modulating both composition and function of the gut microbiome, little is known…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Recent research has studied the role of the gut microbiome in modulating risk of several metabolic and immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune psoriasis and arthritis, and cancer. Although it is a well-known fact that diet is a major player in modulating both composition and function of the gut microbiome, little is known…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) -including aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, indomethacin, and piroxicam, among others- constitute one of the most frequently prescribed types of drugs that often cause mucosal lesions, not only in the stomach/duodenum, but also in the small intestine. Although several novel treatments have been explored to prevent or reduce NSAID-induced intestinal lesions (i.e., gastrointestinal-sparing NSAIDs, anti-ulcer drugs, anti-secretory agents,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) -including aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, indomethacin, and piroxicam, among others- constitute one of the most frequently prescribed types of drugs that often cause mucosal lesions, not only in the stomach/duodenum, but also in the small intestine. Although several novel treatments have been explored to prevent or reduce NSAID-induced intestinal lesions (i.e., gastrointestinal-sparing NSAIDs, anti-ulcer drugs, anti-secretory agents,…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The aging process has been previously related to increased levels of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and acute phase proteins in the bloodstream and tissues and to a perturbed gut microbiota. However, the underlying causes of age-associated inflammation remain unclear and it is not known whether this association is correlative or whether the gut microbiota is a cause of age-associated…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

The aging process has been previously related to increased levels of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and acute phase proteins in the bloodstream and tissues and to a perturbed gut microbiota. However, the underlying causes of age-associated inflammation remain unclear and it is not known whether this association is correlative or whether the gut microbiota is a cause of age-associated…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that lifestyle and dietary habits may influence both gut microbiota composition and its possible impact on colorectal cancer (CRC) origin and progression. However, the mechanisms involved in how dietary patterns—in particular omnivorous, vegetarian, and vegan eating habits—impact genotoxic and mutagenic risk markers in the gut have not been fully elucidated. A recent study, led by Prof.…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous research has shown that lifestyle and dietary habits may influence both gut microbiota composition and its possible impact on colorectal cancer (CRC) origin and progression. However, the mechanisms involved in how dietary patterns—in particular omnivorous, vegetarian, and vegan eating habits—impact genotoxic and mutagenic risk markers in the gut have not been fully elucidated. A recent study, led by Prof.…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous research has shown that gut microbiota dysbiosis may be involved in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), which is a chronic inflammatory disease that mainly affects the sacroiliac joints and spine. However, the implications it could have for both local and systemic immune responses in AS has not yet been explored. A recent study, led by Dr. Giovanni Triolo…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that gut microbiota dysbiosis may be involved in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), which is a chronic inflammatory disease that mainly affects the sacroiliac joints and spine. However, the implications it could have for both local and systemic immune responses in AS has not yet been explored. A recent study, led by Dr. Giovanni Triolo…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Previous research has shown that human gut microbial communities may be grouped into three types-called enterotypes-driven by high abundances of Bacteroides (enterotype 1), Prevotella (enterotype 2) and Ruminococcus (enterotype 3). Although gut microbiota may mediate the relationship between dietary habits and cardiovascular diseases, the role of enterotypes in understanding mechanisms linking dietary habits to cardiometabolic diseases has not been explored…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous research has shown that human gut microbial communities may be grouped into three types-called enterotypes-driven by high abundances of Bacteroides (enterotype 1), Prevotella (enterotype 2) and Ruminococcus (enterotype 3). Although gut microbiota may mediate the relationship between dietary habits and cardiovascular diseases, the role of enterotypes in understanding mechanisms linking dietary habits to cardiometabolic diseases has not been explored…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Gut microbiota dysbiosis, which has been defined as “the altered proportion and activity of bacterial groups of gut microbiota”, is suspected to be involved in several metabolic diseases such as hepatic steatosis, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. However, the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. In a recent study, led by Dr. Matteo Serino from the Institut Nacional…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Gut microbiota dysbiosis, which has been defined as “the altered proportion and activity of bacterial groups of gut microbiota”, is suspected to be involved in several metabolic diseases such as hepatic steatosis, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. However, the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. In a recent study, led by Dr. Matteo Serino from the Institut Nacional…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a therapy targeting the gut microbiome with the strongest evidence for efficacy in the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Although gut microbiota dysbiosis is involved in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis, the role of FMT as a therapy for it is still controversial as the two big randomised controlled trials done previously (here; here)…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a therapy targeting the gut microbiome with the strongest evidence for efficacy in the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Although gut microbiota dysbiosis is involved in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis, the role of FMT as a therapy for it is still controversial as the two big randomised controlled trials done previously (here; here)…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.