Category : Stress

Many questions arise when it comes to probiotics and gut microbiota. By what mechanisms of action can probiotics affect host health? What is the role of probiotics in preventing healthcare-associated infections? Do probiotics affect the intestinal barrier? The Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team has asked a selection of world-leading experts to weigh in on the answers, and we're pleased…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Many questions arise when it comes to probiotics and gut microbiota. By what mechanisms of action can probiotics affect host health? What is the role of probiotics in preventing healthcare-associated infections? Do probiotics affect the intestinal barrier? The Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team has asked a selection of world-leading experts to weigh in on the answers, and we're pleased…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The intestinal epithelium is considered a novel target for addressing several acute and chronic gastrointestinal conditions. It also could have a potential role in targeting systemic diseases. It is an active component of the mucosal immune system. When considering the complex ecosystem combining the gastrointestinal epithelium, immune cells and resident microbiota, several probiotics like Lactobacillus fermentum exhibit immunoregulatory effects in…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

The intestinal epithelium is considered a novel target for addressing several acute and chronic gastrointestinal conditions. It also could have a potential role in targeting systemic diseases. It is an active component of the mucosal immune system. When considering the complex ecosystem combining the gastrointestinal epithelium, immune cells and resident microbiota, several probiotics like Lactobacillus fermentum exhibit immunoregulatory effects in…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

For those seeking the latest science on gut health and its applications to clinical practice, Paris was the place to be on March 11th and 12th, 2017. At the 6th GMFH World Summit, over 400 professionals from all over the world met to review the past decade of advances in gut microbiota science and where the field is headed in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For those seeking the latest science on gut health and its applications to clinical practice, Paris was the place to be on March 11th and 12th, 2017. At the 6th GMFH World Summit, over 400 professionals from all over the world met to review the past decade of advances in gut microbiota science and where the field is headed in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Previous research has shown that chemical and physical stress are major influencers of the physiology and ecology of the all microbes that have coevolved with a host. However, the physiologic effects of gut microbiome responses to physiologic stress have been poorly studied in humans. A recent study, led by Dr. Stefan Pasiakos from the Military Nutrition Division at the United…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

Previous research has shown that chemical and physical stress are major influencers of the physiology and ecology of the all microbes that have coevolved with a host. However, the physiologic effects of gut microbiome responses to physiologic stress have been poorly studied in humans. A recent study, led by Dr. Stefan Pasiakos from the Military Nutrition Division at the United…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A recent review, published by Julia Schwartzman and Edward Ruby from the Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology at University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA), argues that chemical and physical stresses should be considered a normal attribute of the host symbiotic milieu. Their arguments are as follows. Microorganisms appeared on the Earth as early as 3.4 billion years ago, and as humans…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A recent review, published by Julia Schwartzman and Edward Ruby from the Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology at University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA), argues that chemical and physical stresses should be considered a normal attribute of the host symbiotic milieu. Their arguments are as follows. Microorganisms appeared on the Earth as early as 3.4 billion years ago, and as humans…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A study by De Palma, et al. used germ-free and specific pathogen-free mouse models to investigate the effects of early-life stress. Researchers reported that stress (maternal separation) altered the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in mice. Colonizing adult germ-free mice with the same microbiota led to distinct microbial profiles in mice who had experienced early-life stress. After colonization, behaviour was altered in the stressed…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.

A study by De Palma, et al. used germ-free and specific pathogen-free mouse models to investigate the effects of early-life stress. Researchers reported that stress (maternal separation) altered the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in mice. Colonizing adult germ-free mice with the same microbiota led to distinct microbial profiles in mice who had experienced early-life stress. After colonization, behaviour was altered in the stressed…

Paul Enck
Prof. Dr. Paul Enck, Director of Research, Dept. of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. His main interests are gut functions in health and disease, including functional and inflammatory bowel disorders, the role of the gut microbiota, regulation of eating and food intake and its disorders, of nausea, vomiting and motion sickness, and the psychophysiology and neurobiology of the placebo response, with specific emphasis on age and gender contributions. He has published more than 170 original data paper in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, and more than 250 book chapters and review articles. He is board member/treasurer of the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility and of the German Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, and has served as reviewer for many international journals and grant agencies.