Category : Celiac Disease

For those seeking the latest science on gut health and its applications to clinical practice, Paris was the place to be on March 11th and 12th, 2017. At the 6th GMFH World Summit, over 400 professionals from all over the world met to review the past decade of advances in gut microbiota science and where the field is headed in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For those seeking the latest science on gut health and its applications to clinical practice, Paris was the place to be on March 11th and 12th, 2017. At the 6th GMFH World Summit, over 400 professionals from all over the world met to review the past decade of advances in gut microbiota science and where the field is headed in…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Public awareness about the importance of the gut microbiota is growing, but many nutrition professionals struggle to know how to incorporate findings from gut microbiota science into their practice. In a rapidly-progressing field, what should clinicians know about how gut microbes and diet interact to produce different health outcomes? At the 2017 Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit in Paris…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Public awareness about the importance of the gut microbiota is growing, but many nutrition professionals struggle to know how to incorporate findings from gut microbiota science into their practice. In a rapidly-progressing field, what should clinicians know about how gut microbes and diet interact to produce different health outcomes? At the 2017 Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit in Paris…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Celiac disease (CeD) is a complex immune mediated disorder that is triggered by abnormal immune responses to the dietary protein gluten, which is found in grains like wheat, barley, and rye. Normally, immune tolerance to dietary proteins prevents inflammatory immune responses from developing. However, in those with CeD, the presence of HLA susceptibility genes plus unknown environmental or immune triggers…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Celiac disease (CeD) is a complex immune mediated disorder that is triggered by abnormal immune responses to the dietary protein gluten, which is found in grains like wheat, barley, and rye. Normally, immune tolerance to dietary proteins prevents inflammatory immune responses from developing. However, in those with CeD, the presence of HLA susceptibility genes plus unknown environmental or immune triggers…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition involving an immune reaction that is triggered by dietary gluten, found in wheat, barley and rye. Partially digested gluten peptides can trigger symptoms in genetically susceptible individuals, expressing HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 genes. While necessary for disease development, the expression of DQ2/DQ8 is not sufficient for disease development, suggesting a critical role for environmental factors.…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition involving an immune reaction that is triggered by dietary gluten, found in wheat, barley and rye. Partially digested gluten peptides can trigger symptoms in genetically susceptible individuals, expressing HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 genes. While necessary for disease development, the expression of DQ2/DQ8 is not sufficient for disease development, suggesting a critical role for environmental factors.…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Digestive Disease Week 2016 was held in San Diego during the month of May, where the role of the intestinal microbiota in health and disease continues to be a major topic in gastroenterology. This year, the functional role of the microbiota was especially highlighted in both clinical and basic science sessions, where there was a focus on microbiota transfer studies…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Digestive Disease Week 2016 was held in San Diego during the month of May, where the role of the intestinal microbiota in health and disease continues to be a major topic in gastroenterology. This year, the functional role of the microbiota was especially highlighted in both clinical and basic science sessions, where there was a focus on microbiota transfer studies…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

At the 7th edition of the latest Spanish Society of Probiotics and Prebiotics (SEPyP)’s annual workshop, which was held on Seville (Spain) on January, 28-29th under the theme: “Probiotics, Prebiotics and Health: Scientific Evidence”, Paula Crespo took the time to speak with GMFH editors.   Paula Crespo Escobar, B.Sc., is a dietitian-nutritionist working with the Coeliac Disease and Digestive Immunopathology…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

At the 7th edition of the latest Spanish Society of Probiotics and Prebiotics (SEPyP)’s annual workshop, which was held on Seville (Spain) on January, 28-29th under the theme: “Probiotics, Prebiotics and Health: Scientific Evidence”, Paula Crespo took the time to speak with GMFH editors.   Paula Crespo Escobar, B.Sc., is a dietitian-nutritionist working with the Coeliac Disease and Digestive Immunopathology…

Andreu Prados
Andreu Prados holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy & Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Science writer specialised in gut microbiota and probiotics, working also as lecturer and consultant in nutrition and healthcare. Follow Andreu on Twitter @andreuprados

A recent study of humans with celiac disease who were treated with helminths raised the possibility that an increase in microbial species richness (i.e. the number of different species present) could regulate gluten-induced inflammation in the gut. In general, studies indicate that a rich and diverse microbiota is a healthy one. But is richness the only thing that matters when…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

A recent study of humans with celiac disease who were treated with helminths raised the possibility that an increase in microbial species richness (i.e. the number of different species present) could regulate gluten-induced inflammation in the gut. In general, studies indicate that a rich and diverse microbiota is a healthy one. But is richness the only thing that matters when…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The prevalence of Celiac Disease (CD) has increased in the U.S. in the past 35 years – its true prevalence actually doubled every 15 years. The main driver behind this multifactorial, complex disease seems to be the interplay between genes and gluten, but as evidenced by recent studies, there are additional factors driving this epidemic of CD. Quality and quantity…

Stefan Jellbauer
Stefan Jellbauer is a Field Application Scientist in the Biotech industry. Previously, he was an ORISE fellow at the Food Safety division of the FDA and a Postdoc in Manuela Raffatellu’s lab at University of California, Irvine, where he studied host-pathogen interactions and mucosal immunology. He obtained his PhD in 2010 from Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, Germany.

The prevalence of Celiac Disease (CD) has increased in the U.S. in the past 35 years – its true prevalence actually doubled every 15 years. The main driver behind this multifactorial, complex disease seems to be the interplay between genes and gluten, but as evidenced by recent studies, there are additional factors driving this epidemic of CD. Quality and quantity…

Stefan Jellbauer
Stefan Jellbauer is a Field Application Scientist in the Biotech industry. Previously, he was an ORISE fellow at the Food Safety division of the FDA and a Postdoc in Manuela Raffatellu’s lab at University of California, Irvine, where he studied host-pathogen interactions and mucosal immunology. He obtained his PhD in 2010 from Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, Germany.

Genes contribute to the risk of celiac disease (CD), but the role of environmental factors, including perturbations in gut microbiota, is so far unclear. We recently published a review article focusing on the role of the gut microbiota in oral tolerance to food antigens. The article discusses the potential mechanisms by which the microbiota might contribute to CD. In studies comparing patients with active…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.

Genes contribute to the risk of celiac disease (CD), but the role of environmental factors, including perturbations in gut microbiota, is so far unclear. We recently published a review article focusing on the role of the gut microbiota in oral tolerance to food antigens. The article discusses the potential mechanisms by which the microbiota might contribute to CD. In studies comparing patients with active…

Elena Verdú
Dr. Verdu’s research has focused on the pathophysiology of inflammatory and functional gastrointestinal disorders. She undertook clinical research training at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she studied the interaction between chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastritis in humans and the possible therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria. Her PhD studies in the Institute of Microbiology and Gnotobiology at the Czech Academy of Science and University of Lausanne focused on the effect of bacterial antigens in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. As a post-doctoral fellow at McMaster University she gained experience with animal models of gut functional diseases and investigated the mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria. As a member of the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, Dr. Verdu investigates host-microbial and dietary interactions in the context of celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. She has been honored with the New Investigator Award (Canadian Celiac Association), the New Investigator Award (Functional Gut-Brain Research Group, USA) and the Campbell Research Award in celiac disease (Canadian Celiac Association). The American Gastroenterology Association and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology have awarded her the “Master’s in Gastroenterology Award” for basic science and “Young Investigator’s Award”, respectively. She is Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Dep. of Medicine at McMaster University and currently directs the Axenic Gnotobiotic Unit at McMaster.