Category : Pregnancy & Early life

From avoiding sushi to obsessive hand-washing, many pregnant women—with good reason—do everything in their power to avoid becoming sick. But when a woman does develop a minor ailment like a cold during pregnancy, she may be strongly tempted to seek out antibiotics—just to be on the safe side. But a new study adds to evidence that this might not be…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

From avoiding sushi to obsessive hand-washing, many pregnant women—with good reason—do everything in their power to avoid becoming sick. But when a woman does develop a minor ailment like a cold during pregnancy, she may be strongly tempted to seek out antibiotics—just to be on the safe side. But a new study adds to evidence that this might not be…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Prepare yourself: You are going to take an exciting and rare tour few humans have ever taken before. In fact, it is a grand tour you cannot access through any travel agency—it’s a journey into the human body. You will be making stops at every place where microorganisms live. They all form what is known as your microbiota. The first…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Prepare yourself: You are going to take an exciting and rare tour few humans have ever taken before. In fact, it is a grand tour you cannot access through any travel agency—it’s a journey into the human body. You will be making stops at every place where microorganisms live. They all form what is known as your microbiota. The first…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Alisa had to pack up and move while she was eight months pregnant—a stressful undertaking even without bearing an extra 25 pounds and an inability to tie her own shoes. But luckily, her best friend stepped in. As Alisa reports, “My bestie helped to pack up well over half my house as well as scrubbed the [entire] new home we…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Alisa had to pack up and move while she was eight months pregnant—a stressful undertaking even without bearing an extra 25 pounds and an inability to tie her own shoes. But luckily, her best friend stepped in. As Alisa reports, “My bestie helped to pack up well over half my house as well as scrubbed the [entire] new home we…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The GMFH editing team recommends these book selections on the topic. If you find yourself wanting to dig deep into the topic of gut microbiota, you’re not alone! Thousands of readers around the world are availing themselves of the growing list of resources on this fascinating topic. It’s important to know, though, that not all of the existing books about…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The GMFH editing team recommends these book selections on the topic. If you find yourself wanting to dig deep into the topic of gut microbiota, you’re not alone! Thousands of readers around the world are availing themselves of the growing list of resources on this fascinating topic. It’s important to know, though, that not all of the existing books about…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In countries where parents have access to modern medical care, they bring a new baby to regular checkups through its first years of life. The parents proudly report the milestones: clapping, crawling, drinking from a cup—and of course, medical staff carefully track the baby’s growth. But in some places and for some children, the steady upward slant on the growth…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

In countries where parents have access to modern medical care, they bring a new baby to regular checkups through its first years of life. The parents proudly report the milestones: clapping, crawling, drinking from a cup—and of course, medical staff carefully track the baby’s growth. But in some places and for some children, the steady upward slant on the growth…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Around 20% of children population in Western countries have asthma, the most prevalent child chronic health condition. Worldwide, there are 235 million asthmatic people, according to World Health Organisation. Until now, the disease was associated to a combination of genetic and environmental factors, such as air pollution. Some recent studies had also demonstrated in animal models that an altered gut…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Around 20% of children population in Western countries have asthma, the most prevalent child chronic health condition. Worldwide, there are 235 million asthmatic people, according to World Health Organisation. Until now, the disease was associated to a combination of genetic and environmental factors, such as air pollution. Some recent studies had also demonstrated in animal models that an altered gut…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

The placenta is not a hermetic shelter as was once thought. Recent research shows it harbours a unique ecosystem of bacteria coming from the mother. And alterations of that microbial community, claims Kjersti Aagaard of Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston (USA), may lead some women to give birth prematurely. Aagaard investigates the impact of gestational…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

The placenta is not a hermetic shelter as was once thought. Recent research shows it harbours a unique ecosystem of bacteria coming from the mother. And alterations of that microbial community, claims Kjersti Aagaard of Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston (USA), may lead some women to give birth prematurely. Aagaard investigates the impact of gestational…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Worldwide each year more than a million infants are born to women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus causing AIDS.  Mother-to-child transmission is prevented in most of the cases with maternal antiretroviral treatment during pregnancy, labour, and breastfeeding, and also with a short course of antiretroviral drugs for the baby. Although these infants do not become infected, they…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Worldwide each year more than a million infants are born to women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus causing AIDS.  Mother-to-child transmission is prevented in most of the cases with maternal antiretroviral treatment during pregnancy, labour, and breastfeeding, and also with a short course of antiretroviral drugs for the baby. Although these infants do not become infected, they…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Until not so long, it was thought that disturbances in gut microbiota, what is medically called ‘dysbiosis’, were associated to disease. Nevertheless, scientists have discovered that there is a particular period in life where changes reveal to be key to health, and that moment is pregnancy. Researcher Omry Koren, from Bar Ilan University, in Israel, studies what happens to microbiota…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Until not so long, it was thought that disturbances in gut microbiota, what is medically called ‘dysbiosis’, were associated to disease. Nevertheless, scientists have discovered that there is a particular period in life where changes reveal to be key to health, and that moment is pregnancy. Researcher Omry Koren, from Bar Ilan University, in Israel, studies what happens to microbiota…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For a long time, babies were thought to be born germ-free. Now we know they carry some bacteria and that the delivery mode can influence the microbiota they are starting life with and even their health. Researcher José Clemente, assistant professor at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, investigates whether we can revert the effects…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

For a long time, babies were thought to be born germ-free. Now we know they carry some bacteria and that the delivery mode can influence the microbiota they are starting life with and even their health. Researcher José Clemente, assistant professor at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, investigates whether we can revert the effects…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team