Category : SCFA

There’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all nutrition. In 2015, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel laid the foundation for this statement with an article that proved that each of us metabolises food differently due, in part, to gut microbiota. Researcher Niv Zmora explained to Gut Microbiota for Health the main results of that study during the GMFH…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

There’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all nutrition. In 2015, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel laid the foundation for this statement with an article that proved that each of us metabolises food differently due, in part, to gut microbiota. Researcher Niv Zmora explained to Gut Microbiota for Health the main results of that study during the GMFH…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Fiber is good for health—that much we know. But for decades, scientists have been searching for the answer to a very simple question: how does dietary fiber manage to benefit the body? The answer turns out to be quite complicated. Currently, scientists think the gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the how fibre benefits health—and it's mostly thanks to…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Fiber is good for health—that much we know. But for decades, scientists have been searching for the answer to a very simple question: how does dietary fiber manage to benefit the body? The answer turns out to be quite complicated. Currently, scientists think the gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the how fibre benefits health—and it's mostly thanks to…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Studies from the past few years have shown gut microbiota is implicated in numerous health conditions, such as obesity, allergies and asthma, as well as colon cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s. Animal studies have shown the key role gut microbiota plays in training and maintaining proper function of the immune system, and also in maintaining good metabolic function. These studies…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Studies from the past few years have shown gut microbiota is implicated in numerous health conditions, such as obesity, allergies and asthma, as well as colon cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s. Animal studies have shown the key role gut microbiota plays in training and maintaining proper function of the immune system, and also in maintaining good metabolic function. These studies…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Among the worst things about coming back to work after summer holidays is acknowledging you have gained some extra weight. Too much indulgence, you may guiltily think. But is that the whole story? According to new research published in the journal Nature, your gut microbiota might have had a role to play. Several studies have already linked changes in the…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Among the worst things about coming back to work after summer holidays is acknowledging you have gained some extra weight. Too much indulgence, you may guiltily think. But is that the whole story? According to new research published in the journal Nature, your gut microbiota might have had a role to play. Several studies have already linked changes in the…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

When you consume dietary fibers, it is not your body that breaks them down—it’s the bacteria in your large intestine! Important molecules produced by this bacterial activity are called short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which comprise a maximum of six carbon atoms along with atoms of oxygen and hydrogen. Your body absorbs around 95% of these SCFAs and puts them to…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

When you consume dietary fibers, it is not your body that breaks them down—it’s the bacteria in your large intestine! Important molecules produced by this bacterial activity are called short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which comprise a maximum of six carbon atoms along with atoms of oxygen and hydrogen. Your body absorbs around 95% of these SCFAs and puts them to…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In the human body, immune system activity needs to be set at just the right level. Like a volume dial that must be set loud enough to hear, but not so loud that the neighbours come knocking, immune responses can be neither too high nor too low. High activity means the body starts attacking its own healthy tissues, and low…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

In the human body, immune system activity needs to be set at just the right level. Like a volume dial that must be set loud enough to hear, but not so loud that the neighbours come knocking, immune responses can be neither too high nor too low. High activity means the body starts attacking its own healthy tissues, and low…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team