Category : Infections

Fast food, gut microbes, sweet drinks, desk jobs: over the years, obesity has been blamed on many things. A Time-Life book on food and nutrition from 1967 implicated—among other things—cars. "The automobile has almost eliminated walking," write the authors. "This decrease in exercise, which reduces the requirement for calories, has not always been accompanied by a corresponding decrease in appetite."…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Fast food, gut microbes, sweet drinks, desk jobs: over the years, obesity has been blamed on many things. A Time-Life book on food and nutrition from 1967 implicated—among other things—cars. "The automobile has almost eliminated walking," write the authors. "This decrease in exercise, which reduces the requirement for calories, has not always been accompanied by a corresponding decrease in appetite."…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Let’s say you have a cold—and it’s a bad one. Your head constantly aches, your nose runs, and you cough until you almost choke. You can’t get warm, no matter how many blankets you wrap around yourself. Five days into this misery you’re exhausted and just want to resume your normal life. A massive temptation exists at this stage: to…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

Let’s say you have a cold—and it’s a bad one. Your head constantly aches, your nose runs, and you cough until you almost choke. You can’t get warm, no matter how many blankets you wrap around yourself. Five days into this misery you’re exhausted and just want to resume your normal life. A massive temptation exists at this stage: to…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

‘You are what you eat’ is something we have heard for years, and not only at the doctor’s office. Nevertheless, science is now backing this up – for example, just recently Dr. Gary Wu, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, completed a study that supports this idea. Leading a team of researchers, Wu observed that…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

‘You are what you eat’ is something we have heard for years, and not only at the doctor’s office. Nevertheless, science is now backing this up – for example, just recently Dr. Gary Wu, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, completed a study that supports this idea. Leading a team of researchers, Wu observed that…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Martin J. Blaser, director of the Department of Medicine at New York University School of Medicine, is one of the world's greatest experts in the relationship between use and overuse of antibiotics and the gut microbiota. We were able to interview him during the 4th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit and discover the biological cost of antibiotic overuse, what…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Martin J. Blaser, director of the Department of Medicine at New York University School of Medicine, is one of the world's greatest experts in the relationship between use and overuse of antibiotics and the gut microbiota. We were able to interview him during the 4th Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit and discover the biological cost of antibiotic overuse, what…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Patrice D. Cani is a researcher and Professor from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS) and team leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Université catholique de Louvain's Brussels-based Louvain Drug Research Institute. He was one of the scientists who came up with the concept of a prebiotic while working at Nathalie Delzenne’s and Marcel Roberfroid’s…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Patrice D. Cani is a researcher and Professor from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS) and team leader in the Metabolism and Nutrition research group at the Université catholique de Louvain's Brussels-based Louvain Drug Research Institute. He was one of the scientists who came up with the concept of a prebiotic while working at Nathalie Delzenne’s and Marcel Roberfroid’s…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Over millions of years of evolution, humans and their gut microorganisms get on well and have a mutually beneficial relationship. We provide the microorganisms with shelter and nourishment and in exchange, these hundreds of trillions of tiny microbes living inside us contribute to our health and metabolism by performing different and important tasks. One key function is how they help…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Over millions of years of evolution, humans and their gut microorganisms get on well and have a mutually beneficial relationship. We provide the microorganisms with shelter and nourishment and in exchange, these hundreds of trillions of tiny microbes living inside us contribute to our health and metabolism by performing different and important tasks. One key function is how they help…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

"Do no harm" is a fundamental principle in medicine. It means that doctors are usually conservative with any treatment that might have risks, even if there's a chance that it may heal the patient. So if doctors worldwide have been generous with antibiotics in past decades, it's because they haven't considered antibiotics very risky. In the book Missing Microbes: How…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

"Do no harm" is a fundamental principle in medicine. It means that doctors are usually conservative with any treatment that might have risks, even if there's a chance that it may heal the patient. So if doctors worldwide have been generous with antibiotics in past decades, it's because they haven't considered antibiotics very risky. In the book Missing Microbes: How…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We have known for some time that certain conditions like obesity, cancer and some autoimmune disorders like lupus may cause changes in the composition of our gut microbiota. We did not know, however, which conditions caused more modifications than others, what the effects were and whether these alterations could be used to identify those different illnesses. Two studies led by…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We have known for some time that certain conditions like obesity, cancer and some autoimmune disorders like lupus may cause changes in the composition of our gut microbiota. We did not know, however, which conditions caused more modifications than others, what the effects were and whether these alterations could be used to identify those different illnesses. Two studies led by…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The brain is the most highly protected organ in the human body. It has a layer of cells covering it that act as a relentless guard that regulates the passage and exchange of nutrients and molecules between the bloodstream and the brain parenchyma, the nervous tissue in the brain. This barrier - the so-called blood-brain barrier - is essential for…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

The brain is the most highly protected organ in the human body. It has a layer of cells covering it that act as a relentless guard that regulates the passage and exchange of nutrients and molecules between the bloodstream and the brain parenchyma, the nervous tissue in the brain. This barrier - the so-called blood-brain barrier - is essential for…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As we explained in a previous post, many studies have shown that antibiotic treatment alters our gut microbiota. A study led by Spanish scientists now shows that the changes in the composition of bacterial communities found in our intestine caused by prolonged exposure to antibiotics may lead to weight gain. The metabolic activity of the bacteria that live in our…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

As we explained in a previous post, many studies have shown that antibiotic treatment alters our gut microbiota. A study led by Spanish scientists now shows that the changes in the composition of bacterial communities found in our intestine caused by prolonged exposure to antibiotics may lead to weight gain. The metabolic activity of the bacteria that live in our…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team