Category : Anxiety & Depression

When you fall in love and you feel butterflies in your stomach; or when you are nervous before an exam and you have a stomachache: gut feelings are real. Although the scientific link between the gut and emotions is unknown, increasing evidence suggests that the microbiota may have a role in gut-brain communication. And now, in healthy humans, researchers have…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

When you fall in love and you feel butterflies in your stomach; or when you are nervous before an exam and you have a stomachache: gut feelings are real. Although the scientific link between the gut and emotions is unknown, increasing evidence suggests that the microbiota may have a role in gut-brain communication. And now, in healthy humans, researchers have…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Advertisements for the various health benefits of different probiotics —for digestive problems but also beyond the gut— are everywhere these days. But do probiotics really work? A new study published in the journal Gastroenterology showed that a specific probiotic can help to treat symptoms of depression in patients who suffer from a common gastrointestinal disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (or IBS).…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Advertisements for the various health benefits of different probiotics —for digestive problems but also beyond the gut— are everywhere these days. But do probiotics really work? A new study published in the journal Gastroenterology showed that a specific probiotic can help to treat symptoms of depression in patients who suffer from a common gastrointestinal disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (or IBS).…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The past five years have been an especially rapid time of discovery, thanks to scientists studying the gut microbiota and how it influences the gut-brain axis—the two-way communication channel between the digestive tract and the brain. Not only are links being made between gut microbiota composition and conditions like depression and anxiety, but the gut also shows potential for revealing…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

The past five years have been an especially rapid time of discovery, thanks to scientists studying the gut microbiota and how it influences the gut-brain axis—the two-way communication channel between the digestive tract and the brain. Not only are links being made between gut microbiota composition and conditions like depression and anxiety, but the gut also shows potential for revealing…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

"I want to make a difference in the world. Not drag myself from A to B until I die," wrote a sufferer of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)—a condition characterized by symptoms of pain and cramping, bloating, and cycles of diarrhea and/or constipation. It’s a statement of extreme hopelessness. And it comes from a person whose diagnosis is a digestive one.…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

"I want to make a difference in the world. Not drag myself from A to B until I die," wrote a sufferer of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)—a condition characterized by symptoms of pain and cramping, bloating, and cycles of diarrhea and/or constipation. It’s a statement of extreme hopelessness. And it comes from a person whose diagnosis is a digestive one.…

Kristina Campbell
Science writer Kristina Campbell (M.Sc.), from British Columbia (Canada), specializes in communicating about the gut microbiota, digestive health, and nutrition. Author of the best selling Well-Fed Microbiome Cookbook, her freelance work has appeared in publications around the world. Kristina joined the Gut Microbiota for Health publishing team in 2014.  Find her on: GoogleTwitter

We all have a second brain, located in our gut, which influences our mood and even our well-being. It consists on hundreds of million of neurons, more than the spinal cord has, and it is embedded in the walls of our gut. Its main job is transmitting information from the microbiota to the brain and the other way round. And…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

We all have a second brain, located in our gut, which influences our mood and even our well-being. It consists on hundreds of million of neurons, more than the spinal cord has, and it is embedded in the walls of our gut. Its main job is transmitting information from the microbiota to the brain and the other way round. And…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut bacteria may play a crucial role in inducing anxiety and depression, according to a new study by researchers at McMaster University (Canada), published in the journal Nature Communications. The research, carried out in rodents, is the first of its kind to explore how gut microbiota works in the onset of altered behaviour deriving from early life stress. A team…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Gut bacteria may play a crucial role in inducing anxiety and depression, according to a new study by researchers at McMaster University (Canada), published in the journal Nature Communications. The research, carried out in rodents, is the first of its kind to explore how gut microbiota works in the onset of altered behaviour deriving from early life stress. A team…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team