Category : Cancer & Tumors

Gut microbiota may influence the effectiveness of the drugs we take and even medical treatments for infections—such as those caused by HIV—or cancer. This was one of the main messages presented at the latest edition of BDebate, an international experts' conference promoted by Biocat - the organization that coordinates and promotes the healthcare and life sciences sector in Catalonia- and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Gut microbiota may influence the effectiveness of the drugs we take and even medical treatments for infections—such as those caused by HIV—or cancer. This was one of the main messages presented at the latest edition of BDebate, an international experts' conference promoted by Biocat - the organization that coordinates and promotes the healthcare and life sciences sector in Catalonia- and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

In the past decades, some studies have shed light on the importance of diet in reducing the risk of cancer. More and more evidence is accumulating that gut microbiota could be involved in this relationship between food and disease. A senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute (USA), Rashmi Sinha studies the link between what we eat, our health and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

In the past decades, some studies have shed light on the importance of diet in reducing the risk of cancer. More and more evidence is accumulating that gut microbiota could be involved in this relationship between food and disease. A senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute (USA), Rashmi Sinha studies the link between what we eat, our health and…

Cristina Sáez
Cristina Saez is a freelance science journalist. She works for several media, for instance the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia, where she coordinates the science section, Big Vang; as well as research centres and scientific societies. She has been awarded for her journalistic work, among others, with the Boehringer Ingelheim Award in Medical Journalism 2015. Follow Cristina on Twitter @saez_cristina

Colorectal cancer (also known as bowel cancer) is the third most common cancer in the world, according to World Cancer Research Fund International. By 2035, it is predicted there will be 2.4 million cases of this type of tumour diagnosed annually worldwide, mostly in developed countries. The risk of developing it is about 1 in 20 (5%) and it is…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Colorectal cancer (also known as bowel cancer) is the third most common cancer in the world, according to World Cancer Research Fund International. By 2035, it is predicted there will be 2.4 million cases of this type of tumour diagnosed annually worldwide, mostly in developed countries. The risk of developing it is about 1 in 20 (5%) and it is…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of The American Academy of Microbiology. It was already known that inflammation played an important role in the development of colorectal…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team

Transferring microbes from the colon of a mouse with a colorectal tumour to a healthy mouse means the latter will also develop cancer, according to a study recently published in mBio® by Zackular JP  et al., the open access journal of The American Academy of Microbiology. It was already known that inflammation played an important role in the development of colorectal…

GMFH Editing Team
GMFH Editing Team