Heather Galipeau

Written by Heather Galipeau

Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Advertisements for the various health benefits of different probiotics —for digestive problems but also beyond the gut— are everywhere these days. But do probiotics really work? A new study published in the journal Gastroenterology showed that a specific probiotic can help to treat symptoms of depression in patients who suffer from a common gastrointestinal disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (or IBS).…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Advertisements for the various health benefits of different probiotics —for digestive problems but also beyond the gut— are everywhere these days. But do probiotics really work? A new study published in the journal Gastroenterology showed that a specific probiotic can help to treat symptoms of depression in patients who suffer from a common gastrointestinal disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (or IBS).…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Celiac disease (CeD) is a complex immune mediated disorder that is triggered by abnormal immune responses to the dietary protein gluten, which is found in grains like wheat, barley, and rye. Normally, immune tolerance to dietary proteins prevents inflammatory immune responses from developing. However, in those with CeD, the presence of HLA susceptibility genes plus unknown environmental or immune triggers…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Celiac disease (CeD) is a complex immune mediated disorder that is triggered by abnormal immune responses to the dietary protein gluten, which is found in grains like wheat, barley, and rye. Normally, immune tolerance to dietary proteins prevents inflammatory immune responses from developing. However, in those with CeD, the presence of HLA susceptibility genes plus unknown environmental or immune triggers…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Canada Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Canada Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

On November 24th 2016, the Gairdner Foundation and the Farncombe Institute at McMaster University (Canada) held a joint symposium, “The Intestinal Microbiome: Beyond Associations and into the Clinic”. The meeting was organized by Dr. Stephen Collins, director of the Farncombe Institute, and Dr. Janet Rossant, President and Scientific Director of the Gairdner Foundation, and featured leading experts in the microbiome…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

On November 24th 2016, the Gairdner Foundation and the Farncombe Institute at McMaster University (Canada) held a joint symposium, “The Intestinal Microbiome: Beyond Associations and into the Clinic”. The meeting was organized by Dr. Stephen Collins, director of the Farncombe Institute, and Dr. Janet Rossant, President and Scientific Director of the Gairdner Foundation, and featured leading experts in the microbiome…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The intestinal microbiota appears to be a key determinant of health and disease. Indeed, microbiota differences are associated with a number of inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the method by which alterations in the microbiota composition (influenced by genetics, the environment, and diet) contribute to IBD pathogenesis is not well understood. In a recently published paper in…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The intestinal microbiota appears to be a key determinant of health and disease. Indeed, microbiota differences are associated with a number of inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the method by which alterations in the microbiota composition (influenced by genetics, the environment, and diet) contribute to IBD pathogenesis is not well understood. In a recently published paper in…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition involving an immune reaction that is triggered by dietary gluten, found in wheat, barley and rye. Partially digested gluten peptides can trigger symptoms in genetically susceptible individuals, expressing HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 genes. While necessary for disease development, the expression of DQ2/DQ8 is not sufficient for disease development, suggesting a critical role for environmental factors.…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition involving an immune reaction that is triggered by dietary gluten, found in wheat, barley and rye. Partially digested gluten peptides can trigger symptoms in genetically susceptible individuals, expressing HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 genes. While necessary for disease development, the expression of DQ2/DQ8 is not sufficient for disease development, suggesting a critical role for environmental factors.…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The inaugural Mucosal Immunology Course and Symposium were held in Toronto (Canada) July 27-30, 2016, with specific focus on the microbiota and mucosal immunity in health and disease.  The “Principles of Mucosal Immunology” course, held one day prior to the symposium, featured a full day of talks by experts in the field of mucosal immunology. The speakers provided a comprehensive…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

The inaugural Mucosal Immunology Course and Symposium were held in Toronto (Canada) July 27-30, 2016, with specific focus on the microbiota and mucosal immunity in health and disease.  The “Principles of Mucosal Immunology” course, held one day prior to the symposium, featured a full day of talks by experts in the field of mucosal immunology. The speakers provided a comprehensive…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Digestive Disease Week 2016 was held in San Diego during the month of May, where the role of the intestinal microbiota in health and disease continues to be a major topic in gastroenterology. This year, the functional role of the microbiota was especially highlighted in both clinical and basic science sessions, where there was a focus on microbiota transfer studies…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.

Digestive Disease Week 2016 was held in San Diego during the month of May, where the role of the intestinal microbiota in health and disease continues to be a major topic in gastroenterology. This year, the functional role of the microbiota was especially highlighted in both clinical and basic science sessions, where there was a focus on microbiota transfer studies…

Heather Galipeau
Heather Galipeau is a Research Associate at McMaster University (Canada) where she is researching dietary and microbial interactions in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. She obtained her PhD in 2015 from McMaster University in Elena Verdu’s lab, during which she found that the small intestinal microbial background influences the degree of immuno-pathology triggered by dietary antigens, such as gluten.